SUNDAY
July 4, 2004
vol 15, no. 156

Not So Ordinary Time

    A Comparison of the Propers of the Traditional Latin Mass and the Novus Ordo

    by Kevin M. Tierney

for

      Editor's Note: This series on the Propers of the Mass features the apologetics of Kevin M. Tierney in this special feature simply called "Lex Orandi, Lex Credendi" which, of course, translated means roughly how one prays is how one believes. As you can see the differences between the two are as clear as black and white. One, the Latin Mass is full and reverent, the Novus Ordo sterile and bland. It needs innovation and novelty to spice things up. The Latin Mass merely depends on the Divine. This series compares the Propers of the synthetic Novus Ordo with the absolute Propers of the Traditional Latin Mass to show all that the NOM comes up far, far inferior, if not worse. Many might place the blame on the venom of the vernacular, but we all know what vipers injected this poison. It must be sucked out and spit out forever. Hopefully this series will give readers motivation to expedite that process in the counter-revolution dedicated to taking back the Mystical Body of Christ for Christ! He focuses today on the Fifth Sunday After Pentecost and the 14th Sunday in Ordinary Time.

Editor's Note: For the Traditional SUNDAY MASS with the Latin included, see "Exáudi, Dómine"

    FIFTH SUNDAY AFTER PENTECOST
    Traditional Proper compared to
    the Novus Ordo
    14th SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME

    Before we really begin, I would like to apologize to my readers for "slacking" as of late, as things have been very busy in the world of your humble journalist. I would appreciate any prayers one can offer for me, and remember that my readers are always in my prayers. With that said, let us begin.

    For the past few weeks, your humble journalist decided to do a little "covert mission" and attended the Novus Ordo for the past two Sundays, as they launch "Ordinary Time", which, as I found out, was not so ordinary after all. I remember a prominent Neo-Catholic friend telling me that when the Instruction Redemptionis Sacramentum came out, to wait a few months for everyone to begin implementing it. If everyone remembers, this was the much hailed liturgical document that was supposed to crack down on all the abuses. Without getting into much detail, things are exactly the same as they were before. One example, I was specifically told not to receive communion kneeling and on the tongue, even though the liturgical document states nobody may be refused receiving it this way. When finally pressed on this manner, the priest I was discussing the manner with (I shall withhold his name publicly) stated "Well they can't refuse you if you persist, but to do so is not to follow proper disciplines, and distracts everyone from communion." I believe that answer speaks for itself.

    Though the document could be fully implemented, and this column would still be running. The problem is not that of liturgical abuse in the Novus Ordo, but the prayers, readings, and structure of the Novus Ordo itself. This liturgical document covered nothing new, except that what was previously an abuse and condemned was now accepted. (i.e. Altar Girls) Further demonstrating which by now should be obvious to all readers of this column, the Novus Ordo's inferiority shall be again demonstrated, this time comparing the Fifth Sunday After Pentecost with the Fourteenth Sunday of "Ordinary Time", which, we shall find out is not so ordinary.

    As is the custom in this series, The Traditional Mass will be marked by TM and be in blue type , the Novus Ordo Missae by NOM and in maroon type, as in marooned by synthetic novelty) We begin with the Introit.

    Hear, O Lord, my voice with which I have cried to Thee: be Thou my helper, forsake me not, no d Thou despise me, O God My Saviour. The Lord is my light and my salvation, whom shall I fear? Glory be to the Father... Repeat The Lord is my light... (Introit, TR, Psalm 24:1-2)

    Within your temple, we ponder your loving kindness, O God. As your name, so also your praise reaches to the ends of the earth; your right hand is filled with justice. (Psalm 48:10-11)

    One notices a few things in the Traditional Introit that you will rarely find being talked about in the Novus Ordo. Once again, we notice the humility in which the tone is set. If there is one thing the Novus Ordo lacks today, it is humility. One can understand this just by recognizing one word that is gone from most of the prayers is “beseech”, we long beseech God for anything. In the Preface, we no longer join our voices with the Angels and Saints, singing in lowly praise. All of this is gone in the “Revised Missal”, which seems to revise any attempt at being humble. In “attempting to speak to modern man” we come with the baggage of modern man’s arrogance, who proclaims that God is dead, and man is King. If God is dead, or for all practical purposes not part of our everyday lives (something the Novus Ordo seems to do by constantly avoiding talking about the temporal sphere, focusing only on the eternal), why should we ask anything in humility?

    O God, who has prepared for those who love Thee such good things as eye hath not seen; pour into our hearts such love towards Thee, that we loving Thee above all things, may obtain Thy promises, which exceed all that we can desire. Through Our Lord…. (Collect, TM)

    Father, through the obedience of Jesus, your servant and your Son, you raised a fallen world. Free us from sin and bring us the joy that lasts for ever. We ask this through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen. (Opening Prayer, NOM)

    One notices more of the same we see every week. The Traditional Introit and Collect go hand in hand. The Introit talks about God providing for us, and us humbly crying to him, and the Collect prays that those who love God may receive his great heavenly promises. Notice it is to only those who love God, those of good will. God is not an arbitrary God. God takes sides. There used to always be the joke about if God was placing bets in the Super Bowl what team He would pick. There’s a hint of truth to that. If one despises God, God does not stay neutral, but actively aligns Himself against them if they remain in that state. Likewise, to those who love and serve God, He sides with them. The Novus Ordo (especially in its English translation) obscures this fact when “peace to men of good will” in the Gloria becomes “and peace to his people on earth.” Proper disposition and good will are things we don’t really hear much about today. Furthermore, what is the “joy that lasts forever” the Novus Ordo talks about. The Traditional Mass makes it quite clear “what eye hath not seen” indicating of things that are supernatural in origin, that can’t be explained away naturally. As we have seen from the lectionary, these kinds of things have to go.

    And in fine, be ye all of one mind, having compassion one of another, being lovers of the brotherhood, merciful, modest, humble: Not rendering evil for evil, nor railing for railing, but contrariwise, blessing: for unto this are you called, that you may inherit a blessing. For he that will love life, and see good days, let him refrain his tongue from evil, and his lips that they speak no guile. Let him decline from evil, and do good: let him seek after peace and pursue it: Because the eyes of the Lord are upon the just, and his ears unto their prayers: but the countenance of the Lord upon them that do evil things. And who is he that can hurt you, if you be zealous of good? But if also you suffer any thing for justice' sake, blessed are ye. And be not afraid of their fear, and be not troubled. But sanctify the Lord Christ in your hearts, being ready always to satisfy every one that asketh you a reason of that hope which is in you. (Epistle, TM, 1 Peter 3: 8-15)

    Thus says the LORD: Rejoice with Jerusalem and be glad because of her, all you who love her; exult, exult with her, all you who were mourning over her! Oh, that you may suck fully of the milk of her comfort, that you may nurse with delight at her abundant breasts! For thus says the LORD: Lo, I will spread prosperity over Jerusalem like a river, and the wealth of the nations like an overflowing torrent. As nurslings, you shall be carried in her arms, and fondled in her lap; as a mother comforts her child, so will I comfort you; in Jerusalem you shall find your comfort. When you see this, your heart shall rejoice and your bodies flourish like the grass; the LORD's power shall be known to his servants. (NOM IS 66:10-14c)

    When one studies the changes in the Novus Ordo enough, the patterns become all to predictable. Let us see what actually was omitted, by citing all of IS 66:14, the omitted part in bold.

    When you see this, your heart shall rejoice, and your bodies flourish like the grass; The LORD'S power shall be known to his servants, but to his enemies, his wrath.

    It really is that predictable. True to form, this verse in question omits the fact that the enemies of God feel the wrath of God. Since those who 40 years ago were enemies of the Church are now praised as groups whom we could learn much from, any verse which paints these groups as not of God needs to be done away with. (One notes it truly is sad to where Catholic spirituality today has hit such a low, that rather than look to the Traditional Mystics of the Church, we look to Islamic spirituality and discipline.) Notice that God blesses those who serve him, and the people recognize this. The enemies only recognize God's judgment and wrath.

    Also true to form is the Traditional Epistle, following the original prayers of God giving grace to those who do well. We are called to do well by our first Pope St. Peter. In it we hear the “patron verse” of apologists, 1st Peter 3:15, a verse that I constantly remind myself of, to give a reason for the hope within me. Yet in today’s society, where the Church no longer has any greater hope than that of other religions, why should we have to worry about this? Furthermore, St. Peter praises the joys of suffering, and if anyone is familiar with my chronicle of Lent in this column, one learns suffering is generally not taught. Indeed, in one of the Novus Ordo Masses I attended, the priest attacked those “pious nuns who didn’t realize the suffering was unnecessary, that God loved them anyway.” One does not learn the hope that comes with suffering in the Novus Ordo, something I feel that is all the more evident when we read the Responsorial Psalm. I shall hereby bold all that is omitted, then explain the significance of it, Psalm 66, or as we Catholics who read the Douay Rheims know it as, Psalm 65.

    Unto the end, a canticle of a psalm of the resurrection. Shout with joy to God, all the earth, Sing ye a psalm to his name; give glory to his praise. Say unto God, How terrible are thy works, O Lord! in the multitude of thy strength thy enemies shall lie to thee. Let all the earth adore thee, and sing to thee: let it sing a psalm to thy name. Come and see the works of God; who is terrible in his counsels over the sons of men. Who turneth the sea into dry land, in the river they shall pass on foot: there shall we rejoice in him. Who by his power ruleth for ever: his eyes behold the nations; let not them that provoke him he exalted in themselves. O bless our God, ye Gentiles: and make the voice of his praise to be heard. Who hath set my soul to live: and hath not suffered my feet to be moved: For thou, O God, hast proved us: thou hast tried us by fire, as silver is tried. Thou hast brought us into a net; thou hast laid afflictions on our back: Thou hast set men over our heads. We have passed through tire and water, and thou hast brought us out into a refreshment. I will go into thy house with burnt offerings: I will pay thee my vows, which my lips have uttered, and my mouth hath spoken, when I was in trouble. I will offer up to thee holocausts full of marrow, with burnt offerings of rams: I will offer to thee bullocks with goats. Come and hear, all ye that fear God, and I will tell you what great things he hath done for my soul. I cried to him with my mouth: and I extolled him with my tongue. If I have looked at iniquity in my heart, the Lord will not hear me. Therefore hath God heard me, and hath attended to the voice of my supplication. Blessed be God, who hath not turned away my prayer, nor his mercy from me.

    The Novus Ordo stops right as the story relates of all the sufferings that are endured, and in the end, God delivers from those sufferings, proving Himself, and delivering us into refreshment. When one reads the entire Psalm, one can take great joy in the meaning. Even us Traditional Catholics can. As we are persecuted, as the Novus Ordo lashes out against us, hoping we just "die off", if we stand strong, and continue to hope in God, He shall come to our aid and free us. Yet since this portrays a God that actively is involved with his created world, something the Novus Ordo goes out of its way to avoid mentioning, once again, they had to go out of their way to avoid teaching this truth. I would like everyone to pay special attention to the end of this particular Psalm. God hears the supplication only after one cries to God (beseeching him). The Novus Ordo simply just has God answering all supplications, but we must remember, he does not answer all, but only those that are right and good. One can see this when they read the English Novus Ordo where rather than having "Glory to God in the Highest, and peace to men of Good will", the Novus Ordo Gloria (if it is actually sung as the Gloria, other than the utterly bland "Sing Glory to God, in place of it" we hear "Glory to God in the Highest, and Peace to his People on Earth." Nowhere do we see that the person must be in good will to share in God's peace. Here we see that even in the official Novus Ordo, this problem remains. The Novus Ordo for it's second reading chooses Galatians 6:14-18, and there is nothing really I wish to comment on, so we shall just mention it for reference purposes for those interested. Now let us move onto a rather confusing set of options for the Gospel.

    For I tell you, that unless your justice abound more than that of the scribes and Pharisees, you shall not enter into the kingdom of heaven. You have heard that it was said to them of old: Thou shalt not kill. And whosoever shall kill shall be in danger of the judgment. But I say to you, that whosoever is angry with his brother, shall be in danger of the judgment. And whosoever shall say to his brother, Raca, shall be in danger of the council. And whosoever shall say, Thou Fool, shall be in danger of hell fire. If therefore thou offer thy gift at the altar, and there thou remember that thy brother hath any thing against thee; Leave there thy offering before the altar, and go first to be reconciled to thy brother: and then coming thou shalt offer thy gift. (Gospel, TM, TM, Matthew 5: 20-24)

    At that time the Lord appointed seventy-two others whom he sent ahead of him in pairs to every town and place he intended to visit. He said to them, "The harvest is abundant but the laborers are few; so ask the master of the harvest to send out laborers for his harvest. Go on your way; behold, I am sending you like lambs among wolves. Carry no money bag, no sack, no sandals; and greet no one along the way. Into whatever house you enter, first say, 'Peace to this household.' If a peaceful person lives there, your peace will rest on him; but if not, it will return to you. Stay in the same house and eat and drink what is offered to you, for the laborer deserves his payment. Do not move about from one house to another. Whatever town you enter and they welcome you, eat what is set before you, cure the sick in it and say to them, 'The kingdom of God is at hand for you.' Whatever town you enter and they do not receive you, go out into the streets and say, 'The dust of your town that clings to our feet, even that we shake off against you.' Yet know this: the kingdom of God is at hand. I tell you, it will be more tolerable for Sodom on that day than for that town. The seventy-two returned rejoicing, and said, "Lord, even the demons are subject to us because of your name." Jesus said, "I have observed Satan fall like lightning from the sky. Behold, I have given you the power to 'tread upon serpents' and scorpions and upon the full force of the enemy and nothing will harm you. Nevertheless, do not rejoice because the spirits are subject to you, but rejoice because your names are written in heaven." (Gospel, NOM, Luke 1-12, 17, 20) OR read only verses 1-9)

    First let us talk about what we see in the Traditional Rite. It is the retelling of Christ’s famous sermon in which He demonstrates what the Spirit of the Law is, as opposed to the simple letter. Christ interprets the 10 commandments, showing us what they mean. Not only are to not kill, but even showing anger and rage against your brother is worthy of judgment. We are to be higher than the Jews who kept the letter of the law, and understand the Spirit behind it. This ties us back into the opening prayers of the Mass, in which we do well because of God’s graces. It is only through God’s grace our righteousness will exceed that of the Scribes and Pharisees. In this epistle we talk about keeping the law, and doing good as necessary to enter the Kingdom of Heaven, again telling us what we do today effects our life eternal tomorrow, something the Novus Ordo again fails to be as clear upon.

    The omitted verses in the first part of the Novus Ordo are simply a re-statement of the fate of those who reject Christ, that even in these places of history it was better than those who would reject Christ today. While we should not be omitting words from Scripture, then telling the faithful what they are hearing is the full Word of God, what is omitted in the first part is not much to worry about. I shall quote again the passage, showing what happens when option number 2 is employed.

    At that time the Lord appointed seventy-two others whom he sent ahead of him in pairs to every town and place he intended to visit. He said to them, "The harvest is abundant but the laborers are few; so ask the master of the harvest to send out laborers for his harvest. Go on your way; behold, I am sending you like lambs among wolves. Carry no money bag, no sack, no sandals; and greet no one along the way. Into whatever house you enter, first say, 'Peace to this household.' If a peaceful person lives there, your peace will rest on him; but if not, it will return to you. Stay in the same house and eat and drink what is offered to you, for the laborer deserves his payment. Do not move about from one house to another. Whatever town you enter and they welcome you, eat what is set before you, cure the sick in it and say to them, 'The kingdom of God is at hand for you.' Whatever town you enter and they do not receive you, go out into the streets and say, 'The dust of your town that clings to our feet, even that we shake off against you.' Yet know this: the kingdom of God is at hand. I tell you, it will be more tolerable for Sodom on that day than for that town." Whatever town you enter and they do not receive you, go out into the streets and say, 'The dust of your town that clings to our feet, even that we shake off against you.' Yet know this: the kingdom of God is at hand. I tell you, it will be more tolerable for Sodom on that day than for that town. "Woe to you, Chorazin! Woe to you, Bethsaida! For if the mighty deeds done in your midst had been done in Tyre and Sidon, they would long ago have repented, sitting in sackcloth and ashes. But it will be more tolerable for Tyre and Sidon at the judgment than for you. And as for you, Capernaum, 'Will you be exalted to heaven? You will go down to the netherworld.'" Whoever listens to you listens to me. Whoever rejects you rejects me. And whoever rejects me rejects the one who sent me." The seventy (-two) returned rejoicing, and said, "Lord, even the demons are subject to us because of your name." Jesus said, "I have observed Satan fall like lightning from the sky. Behold, I have given you the power 'to tread upon serpents' and scorpions and upon the full force of the enemy and nothing will harm you. Nevertheless, do not rejoice because the spirits are subject to you, but rejoice because your names are written in Heaven."

    Notice what is gone from the "shortened" version (which I am willing to bet will be read in the majority of Churches this Sunday). There is no mention of the fact of demons being subject to those 72 men sent out by Christ. This is far more in line with the politically correct secular idea that demon possession is simply mental illness, and can be cured by medical and scientific means. One wonders what has happened to the belief of real evil in the world. Well, as before, the Church, since it is the "Church of dialogue" today, no longer has enemies. Since she no longer has enemies, but "dialogue partners", those enemies are not actively trying to destroy her. Hence, one need not worry about demons at all, much less subjecting them, since there are no demons.

    Be appeased, we beseech Thee, O Lord, by our supplications: and in Thy loving kindness, accept the offerings Thy servants and handmaidens lay before Thee, that the offerings of each to the glory of Thy name may profit all alike unto salvation. Through Christ our Lord. (TM, Secret)

    Lord, let this offering to the glory of your name purify us and bring us closer to eternal life. We ask this in the name of Jesus the Lord. Amen. (NOM, Prayer Over the Gifts)

    One notices that the focus for the Traditional Mass is automatically one of a propitiatory nature, asking God to be appeased. Furthermore, we see the “beseeching”. The offerings are given to the Glory of God, and this as a result brings us salvation. The Novus Ordo does not go in as much detail. They just group it under "purify us and bring us closer to eternal life." Once again, the "Revised Missal" rather than clarifying a certain point makes it more ambiguous. We furthermore see the focus on the expiatory nature of the Novus Ordo. It talks about how the offering purifies us, but doesn't really imply God's wrath being appeased. As has been demonstrated before, where the Proper for one Sunday in the Traditional Mass emphasized the fact God’s wrath is appeased, the Novus Ordo simply went to the expiatory area of taking away sin. It stays a sacrifice, but what is the sacrifice set to accomplish?

    Thou hast filled us with Thy heavenly gifts, O Lord: vouchsafe, we beseech Thee, to cleanse us from our hidden faults, and deliver us from the snares of our enemies. Through our Lord. (TM, Postcommunion)

    Lord,may we never fail to praise you for the fullness of life and salvation you give us in this eucharist. We ask this through Christ our Lord. Amen. (NOM, Prayer After Communion)

    The Novus Ordo, focused on man as it is, tells us about how we should feel as a result of the Eucharist, but doesn't explain what the Eucharist is doing. One finds a lot of thought on man's role beginning with Pope Leo XIII, but the Holy Pontiff always took great pains to show how God works within man. The Novus Ordo never explains to us exactly what the Eucharist has done, or what it even is supposed to do. The prayer is based on our subjective feeling. The traditional Rite first tells us that God has filled us with a gift from heaven, and because of that, we are to be cleansed from even our hidden faults, and protected from all enemies. As Christopher Ferrara and Dr. Thomas Woods noted in The Great Façade “When is the last time anyone in the Novus Ordo asked that by the grace of the Eucharist we be preserved from our enemies?” As was noted before in the Propers and readings, the Novus Ordo acts as if there are no enemies of the Church today, hence we need not be protected, but just “dialogue.” Again, the Traditional Rite is very explicit in what the Eucharist is doing, whereas in the Novus Ordo, we understand what man is doing, but nothing is really stated about the Eucharist. If this is “Ordinary Time”, one should be quite afraid of what happens in “extraordinary circumstances.”

Kevin Tierney



    July 4, 2004
    vol 15, no. 156
    Lex Orandi, Lex Credendi