CATHARINE LAMB's Shears and Tears of a Lamb (feb28lam.htm)

SATURDAY
February 28, 2004
vol 15, no. 59

Forever canonized in the Canon of the Mass

Abandoned Saints to sustain Thy Sinful Servants    Part I

    "While New Order bishops and others squirm with repulsion, drowning in their self-made sea of yellow as their illusion of Cushy-Christianity is about to be shattered - especially with the shocking statistics released yesterday that places the abuse blame squarely on the bishops - we are again reminded that it wasn't always so. In the traditional Roman Rite of the Mass we are encouraged and fortified by holy saints and martyrs who knew the price Christ paid for our sins; saints who followed in His footsteps with their own blood. We boldly ask that we, though sinners, be granted some part and fellowship with those who went before us and suffered the cruelest of agonies and death for the sake of the Kingdom. It is no wonder this part of the Holy Mass had to be stricken from the Novus Ordo."

   So far in this series, we've looked at the saints mentioned in the Communicates of the Canon of the Mass, including the Apostles, sainted popes and others, all martyrs in the early years of the Church. With this installment, we'll begin touching on the lives of the great martyrs whose names are mentioned in the Nobis quoque peccatoribus of the Canon.

PRAYERS AFTER THE CONSECRATION
The Priest says audibly:
Nobis quoque peccatoribus
He then returns to saying the following inaudibly for the Canon of the Mass is so sacred
famulis tuis, de multitudine miserationum tuarum sperantibus partem aliquam, et societatem donare digneris, cum tuis sanctis Apostolis et Martyribus: cum Ioanne, Stephano, Matthia, Barnaba, Ignatio, Alexandro, Marcellino, Petro, Felicitate, Perpetua, Agatha, Lucia, Agnete, Caecilia, Anastasia, et omnibus Sanctis suis: intra quorum nos consortium, non aestimator meriti, sed veniae, quaesumus, largitor admitte. Per Christum Dominum nostrum.
The Priest says audibly:
To us also, Thy sinful servants,
He then returns to saying the following inaudibly for the Canon of the Mass is so sacred
confiding in the multitude of Thy mercies, vouchsafe to grant some part and fellowship with Thy holy Apostles and Martyrs, with John, Stephen, Matthias, Barnabas, Ignatius, Alexander, Marcellinus, Peter, Felicitas, Perpetua, Agatha, Lucy, Agnes, Cecilia, Anastasia, and with all Thy Saints, into whose company we beseech Thee to admit us, not weighing our merits, but pardoning our offenses. Through Christ our Lord.

   It's about time the Novus Ordo church was finally challenged to show its true colors. How can any honest, truth-seeking Catholic fail to see it? The colors are all variations of yellow! The uproar within the modern church regarding a a historically accurate, even more-important GOSPEL CORRECT movie depicting the suffering and crucifixion of our Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ, is due to the fact that the Novus Ordo church is a NEW RELIGION based on cowardice.

   The church of the New Order has for 40 years been wandering in the dessert of compromise in order to get along marvelously with the modern world and every degree of strange belief and religion on the face of the earth. In fact, it is not Christ crucified (I Cor. 1:23) which the new church preaches. If you don't believe this, then look for yourselves in the Novus Ordo churches and you will seek in vain for a life-like crucifix; you will seek in vain for the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass; you will seek in vain for an un-sanitized version of the Truth! The church of the New Order is repulsed by the thought of Christ's Passion, which is why they have cleansed the Mass, cleansed their "worship spaces," and they are emptying out their convents and seminaries after having cleansed the Gospels (see Jacob Michael's article on this subject New Church, New Gospel, Part I; Mangling St. Matthew).

   This new religion will have nothing to do with sacrifice and has therefore reduced penance and sacrifice during Lent to a mere trifle, a laughable "fast" of two separate days duration, lest anyone be made uncomfortable or feel old-fashioned. If that isn't bad enough, the Novus Ordo thrives on the notion that people are stupid (look at what they've done to the Mass!) and are going to go out and persecute the Jews after seeing a film which portrays the crucifixion in its true historical context. Modern Catholics need to face the fact that their New Order church considers them to be morons.

   While New Order bishops and others squirm with repulsion, drowning in their self-made sea of yellow as their illusion of Cushy-Christianity is about to be shattered - especially with the shocking statistics released yesterday that places the abuse blame squarely on the bishops - we are again reminded that it wasn't always so. In the traditional Roman Rite of the Mass we are encouraged and fortified by holy saints and martyrs who knew the price Christ paid for our sins; saints who followed in His footsteps with their own blood. We boldly ask that we, though sinners, be granted some part and fellowship with those who went before us and suffered the cruelest of agonies and death for the sake of the Kingdom. It is no wonder this part of the Holy Mass had to be stricken from the Novus Ordo.

THE PRECURSOR

   The first saint whose name is mentioned in the second list of saints in the Canon of the Mass is St. John the Baptist. Much of his life and ministry is recorded in the Gospels, with the Gospel of St. Luke giving the most complete account of his birth, ministry and death. As a tiny, unborn babe, he leaped with joy at the sound of Mary's voice when she visited Elizabeth after the Annunciation, a sign that he was filled with the Holy Ghost, "even from his mother's womb" (Luke 1:16).

   Often referred to as the Precursor because he was sent forth to prepare the way for the coming of the Lord, John was popular among the people and drew large crowds. He came preaching and baptizing, calling the people to repent, and had a following of disciples. Upon seeing Christ, John exclaimed, "Behold! The Lamb of God who takes away the sins of the world!" He saw the Spirit descending upon Christ, and bore witness that Jesus was the Son of God.

   St. John the Baptist dared to publicly rebuke Herod Antipas for his adultery. As Herod grew more fearful of John's popularity and the possibility that the people might be incited to rebel against the tetrarch because of his immoral behavior, Herod had the Baptist arrested. The Gospel of St. Mark tells us that John was beheaded and that his head was brought forth on a platter at the request of Herodias' daughter Salome. John's disciples, hearing of his death, "came and took his body and laid it in a tomb" (Mark, 6: 29), "and came and told Jesus" (Matt., 14:12).

   St. John was great before God "because he forgot himself and lived for Jesus Christ, Who is the source of all greatness." Highly honored within the rites of the Church, we are invited to make the Baptist's words our own, "He must increase, but I must decrease" (John 3:30). The Nativity of St. John the Baptist is celebrated on June 24.

THE FIRST MARTYR

   Saint Stephen is considered to be the first Christian martyr. His story is told in the Holy Scriptures, Acts 6-7. (The church of the New Order would have us forget about St. Stephen, because the Scriptures clearly tell us that he was charged, arrested, and stoned to death by Jews, his own people. However, Stephen unlike most modern "Catholics" loved the Jewish people enough to tell them the truth about Jesus Christ even though the Jews didn't want to hear it.) Stephen was a learned Greek-speaking Jew who converted to Christianity and was among the seven chosen by the Apostles to "take care of the secular needs of the Hellenic Jewish Christian community in Jerusalem."

   After their ordination, the seven began to perform miracles and roused the anger of some of the elders of the Jewish synagogues. Stephen was so successful as a preacher that he was challenged to a debate by some of the Jewish elders who then charged him with blasphemy. Speaking in his own defense he denounced his accusers of having resisted the Holy Spirit, as had their fathers. He described a vision wherein he saw Christ standing at the right hand of God. He was then seized, dragged to the outskirts of town and stoned to death, the first Christian to be murdered for the cause of Christ. With his last words he echoed the plea of Christ, saying, "Lord, lay not this sin to their charge."

   The Catholic Encyclopedia tells us, "Little did all the people present, casting stones upon him realize that the blood they shed was the first seed of a harvest that was to cover the world." His feast day is December 26.

   Next installment of "Abandoned Saints": Saints Matthias and Barnabas

Catharine Lamb


(Sources, The Saint Andrew Daily Missal; Little Pictorial Lives of the Saints, 1925 Benziger Brothers; Pocket Dictionary of Saints by John J. Delaney, Image Books, 1983.)

    For past columns by Catharine, see 2004lam.htm Archives
    February 28, 2004
    vol 15, no. 59
    SHEARS AND TEARS OF A LAMB