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FRI-SAT-SUN      June 25-27, 1999      SECTION ONE       vol 10, no. 123

To print out entire text of Today's issue, print this section as well as SECTION TWO and SECTION THREE


Eighteen years of grace: The Miraculous Miracle of Medjugorje!

      In this weekend's editorial, we commemorate the eighteenth anniversary of the reported Apparitions at Medjugorje. We say "reported" because they have not yet been fully approved by the Church, but the important aspect of all this is that in eighteen years they have not been disapproved. Satan and his cohorts have tried to discredit Our Lady's work at her special Oasis of Peace, but, as we deduce in today's commentary what her Divine Son Jesus has said to the fact that a good tree cannot bear bad fruit. We point out how Medjugorje has withstood the test of time and time is waning down, the sands of this millennium sifting down to the final grains as Our Lady strives to complete the mission she began at Fatima. For this weekend's commentary, Medjugorje is a successful syllogism that makes sense!, click on CATHOLIC PewPOINT.

For an in-depth feature on Medjugorje and why it has impacted so many throughout the world, click on THE STORY OF MEDJUGORJE: 18 YEARS OF GRACE

Medjugorje is a successful syllogism that makes sense!

Michael Cain, editor

Medjugorje's Miraculous Mission


Too many so-called experts complicate and confuse the simple message of Medjugorje

     In her column this week, Sister Mary Lucy Astuto celebrates the 18th anniversary of the apparitions at Medjugorje and asks why we can't get with the program and understand that all Our Lady has conveyed from her special Oasis of Peace comes straight from the Blessed Trinity. She reinforces the good fruit of Medjugorje and how the finite mind cannot fathom why God would allow His Mother to appear there for eighteen straight years. The answer is simple. Man is thick-headed and time is running short, very, very short. Our Lady's messages are mankind's last hope before satan would devour a humanity that would rather embrace the world, the flesh and the devil instead of the rewards and riches of Heavenly bliss as Mary foretells in her messages from Medjugorje - a special spiritual phenomena that has produced a plethora of good fruits worldwide. For her column this weekend, Medjugorje's 18th Anniversary click on GETTING TO THE HEART OF THE MATTER

MEDJUGORJE'S 18th ANNIVERSARY


Tarzan swings into first, unseating last week's swinger Austin Powers during third week of June for Top Ten Movies

      In the third week of June a legendary swinger "Tarzan" ousted another swinger - "Austin Powers: the Spy who...". Probably a bigger surprise was that the megahit Star Wars' "Episode One - The Phantom Menace" dropped to fourth behind first-run "The General's Daughter" a taut, sleazy who-dunnit touting John Travolta. "Notting Hill" came in fifth followed by "Instinct", then "The Mummy" in 7th, "Entrapment" held down 8th, with The Matrix at 9th, and, even though it was only shown in 283 theatres nationwide, "Tea with Mussolini" stayed in the top ten and could stay there when the film is put into wider distribution next week. The next test will be the heavily anticipated Fourth of July weekend when many blockbusters will be released including the campy Wild, Wild West. For the Top Ten review for the third week of June, click on MOVIES AND MORALS
  • 1.   TARZAN


  • 2.   AUSTIN POWERS: THE SPY WHO...


  • 3.   THE GENERAL'S DAUGHTER


  • 4.   STAR WARS: EPISODE ONE - THE PHANTOM MENACE
      (20th Century Fox) -    $18.9 million last week/   $328.1 million in five weeks:
            Because of sci-fi swordfights and battle sequences, the U.S. Catholic Conference classification of Star Wars: Episode I The Phantom Menace is A-II - adults and adolescents. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is PG -- parental guidance suggested. "The Phantom Menace" is a disappointing prequel to the "Star Wars" trilogy in which two Jedi knights (played by Liam Neeson and Ewan McGregor) intent on saving the planet Naboo from Federation invaders enlist the help of a young boy who will eventually become the evil Darth Vader. By emphasizing fantastical creatures and myriad special effects, writer-director George Lucas loses much of the movie's human dimension and ends up achieving mostly visual spectacle. May 1999


  • 5.   NOTTING HILL
      (Universal)   6.9 million last week/   $79.7. million in four weeks:
           Because of an off-screen sexual encounter, some crude references, occasional profanity and minimal rough language, the U.S. Catholic Conference classification is A-III -- adults. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is PG-13 -- parents are strongly cautioned that some material may be inappropriate for children under 13. "Notting Hill" is a gauzy romantic comedy in which a Hollywood movie star (played by Julia Roberts) and a timid London bookseller (Hugh Grant) fall in love but he finds himself too intimidated by her fame to pursue the relationship. The contrived crowd-pleaser is long on stunning smiles and sugary sentiment but short on realistic romance. May-June 1999.


  • 6.   INSTINCT
      (Disney)   $3.22 million last week/   $27.1 million in three weeks:
           Because of intermittent violence and a few instances of rough language and profanity, the U.S. Catholic Conference classification is A-III -- adults. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is R -- restricted. In "Instinct", psychiatrist Cuba Gooding, Jr. must uncover why imprisoned American anthropologist Anthony Hopkins chose to abandon civilization for life among Ruwandan gorillas which led to his killing two park rangers a few years later. Balancing out a simplistic script and formula scenes of prison brutality are the steely performances of the two intense actors. June 1999.


  • 7.   THE MUMMY
      (Universal)   $3.2 million last week/    $142 million in seven weeks:
            Because of recurring stylized violence and fleeting partial nudity, the U.S. Catholic Conference classification is A-III -- adults. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is PG-13 -- parents are strongly cautioned that some material may be inappropriate for children under 13. "The Mummy" is a spirited horror adventure set in 1920's Egypt where a treasure hunting Yank (played by Brendan Fraser) is confronted by a revived 3,000 year-old mummy whose evil powers seemingly know no bounds. The lavishly shot action movie is stuffed with spooky special effects and comical moments that downplay horror in favor of rousing, old-fashioned entertainment. May 1999


  • 8.   ENTRAPMENT
      (20th Century Fox)    $1.35 million last week/   $82 million in eight weeks
            Because of a romanticized view of crime, fleeting violence and a few instances of rough language and profanity, the U.S. Catholic Conference classification is A-IV, adults, with reservations. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is PG-13 -- parents are strongly cautioned that some material may be inappropriate for children under 13. "Entrapment" is a mindless escapist caper in which a wily insurance investigator (played by Catherine Zeta-Jones) appears to join forces with the world's craftiest art thief (played by Sean Connery) to nail him red-handed. The glossy fantasy of double-crossing daredevils is sluggishly directed which limits the suspense. April 1999


  • 9.   THE MATRIX
      (Warner Brothers)     $1.3 million last week/   $163.9 million in twelve weeks
            Because of excessive violence and recurring profanity, the U.S. Catholic Conference classification, O -- morally offensive. Motion Picture Association of America rating, R -- restricted The Matrix is a convoluted sci-fi tale in which a tiny band of cyber rebels led by Keanu Reeves and Laurence Fishburne do battle with virtually indestructible humanoid killers from the 22nd centry. The action movie's violence is glorified, glamorized and made to look exciting with a dazzling array of eyepopping special effects. April 1999


  • 10.   TEA WITH MUSSOLINI
      (MGM)    $614,000. last week/   $8.7 million in two weeks
            Because of some threatening situations, sexual references and a few instances of coarse language the U.S. Catholic Conference classification is A-II adults and adolescents. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is PG -- parental guidance suggested. "Tea with Mussolini" is a warmly nostalgic tale in which several art-loving English matrons (played by Maggie Smith, Joan Plowright and Judi Dench) residing in 1930's Florence care for an abandoned boy who returns as a teen to help when they are interned as enemy aliens during World War II. While it shows how the Italian youth lad comes to appreciate English culture what succeeds best is the gently humorous depiction of the women, including their two brassy American pals (Cher and Lily Tomlin) and how they manage to survive the tragic circumstances of wartime Italy. May 1999
    Reviews provided through Film & Broadcasting Division of the National Conference of Catholic Bishops and figures provided through Exhibitor Relations Co. Inc.

    The DAILY WORD

    "And he who does not take up his cross and follow Me, is not worthy of Me. He who finds his life will lose it, and he who loses his life fosr My sake will find it."

    Matthew 10: 38-39


    Click here to go to SECTION TWO and SECTION THREE or click here to return to the graphics front page of this issue.


    June 25-27, 1999 volume 10, no. 123   DAILY CATHOLIC