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FRI-SAT-SUN      June 18-20, 1999      SECTION ONE       vol 10, no. 118

To print out entire text of Today's issue, print this section as well as SECTION TWO and SECTION THREE


Evil comes in many forms! The seventies were a sick time that made us all sicker so why should we want to glorify it with tripe like " Austin Powers"?

      In this weekend's editorial, with the immense popularity of the newest film "Austin Powers", we ask why on earth we would ever want to be reminded of the psychedelic, psycho seventies. Bad memories don't need to be brought up, especially in regard to those times when so many rejected common sense and the sacredness of sexuality for their own selfish purposes, those times when the Church bought the lies of "spirit of Vatican II" and opened the doors wide for the rebellious modernists to forge their way into the mainstream of Holy Mother Church in trying to wrest control for satan. Fortunately, the liberals' own "dr. evils" did not succeed and an antidote was found to suppress the spread of heresy: Pope John Paul II. For this weekend's commentary, Forget the groovy facade, baby! Let's dump the seventies once and for all! , click on CATHOLIC PewPOINT.

Forget the groovy facade, baby! Let's dump the seventies once and for all!

Michael Cain, editor


As we bob along in life, we should stop to celebrate Father's Day in the Year of the Father!

      In her column this week, Sister Mary Lucy Astuto points out how important God the Father is and how so often He is overlooked in favor of the Son and Holy Spirit but in this Year of the Father, why not take some time to honor Him. For her column this weekend, Dear God, Happy Father's Day! click on GETTING TO THE HEART OF THE MATTER

DEAR GOD, HAPPY FATHER'S DAY!


A Lesser Powers rules the roost during third week of June for Top Ten Movies

      In the second week of June the power of "Austin Powers: the Spy who..." not only beat out the megahit Star Wars' "Episode One - The Phantom Menace" but swamped it by doubling up on the George Lucas prequel. The fact Powers unseated Star Wars in its first week to set all records for a June opening and for a comedy, pretty much assures "Titanic" its place as the all-time box-office hit. "Notting Hill" came in second followed by "Instinct", then "The Mummy" in 5th, "Entrapment" held down 6th, with The Matrix at seventh, the Thirteenth Floor number eight, and the other new entry showing on just a handful of theatres nationwide - "Tea with Mussolini" came in ninth followed by Never Been Kissed at number ten. The ratings prove the people feel the same way. For the Top Ten review for the second week of June, click on MOVIES AND MORALS

TOP TEN MOVIES FOR THE THIRD WEEK OF JUNE

  • 1.   AUSTIN POWERS: THE SPY WHO...
  • 2.   STAR WARS: EPISODE ONE - THE PHANTOM MENACE
      (20th Century Fox) -    $297 million in four weeks:
            Because of sci-fi swordfights and battle sequences, the U.S. Catholic Conference classification of Star Wars: Episode I The Phantom Menace is A-II - adults and adolescents. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is PG -- parental guidance suggested. "The Phantom Menace" is a disappointing prequel to the "Star Wars" trilogy in which two Jedi knights (played by Liam Neeson and Ewan McGregor) intent on saving the planet Naboo from Federation invaders enlist the help of a young boy who will eventually become the evil Darth Vader. By emphasizing fantastical creatures and myriad special effects, writer-director George Lucas loses much of the movie's human dimension and ends up achieving mostly visual spectacle. May 1999

  • 3.   NOTTING HILL
      (Universal)    $67.5 million in three weeks:
           Because of an off-screen sexual encounter, some crude references, occasional profanity and minimal rough language, the U.S. Catholic Conference classification is A-III -- adults. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is PG-13 -- parents are strongly cautioned that some material may be inappropriate for children under 13. "Notting Hill" is a gauzy romantic comedy in which a Hollywood movie star (played by Julia Roberts) and a timid London bookseller (Hugh Grant) fall in love but he finds himself too intimidated by her fame to pursue the relationship. The contrived crowd-pleaser is long on stunning smiles and sugary sentiment but short on realistic romance. May-June 1999.

  • 4.   INSTINCT
      (Disney)    $21.3 million in two weeks:
           Because of intermittent violence and a few instances of rough language and profanity, the U.S. Catholic Conference classification is A-III -- adults. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is R -- restricted. In "Instinct", psychiatrist Cuba Gooding, Jr. must uncover why imprisoned American anthropologist Anthony Hopkins chose to abandon civilization for life among Ruwandan gorillas which led to his killing two park rangers a few years later. Balancing out a simplistic script and formula scenes of prison brutality are the steely performances of the two intense actors. June 1999.

  • 5.   THE MUMMY
      (Universal)    $136.2 million in six weeks:
            Because of recurring stylized violence and fleeting partial nudity, the U.S. Catholic Conference classification is A-III -- adults. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is PG-13 -- parents are strongly cautioned that some material may be inappropriate for children under 13. "The Mummy" is a spirited horror adventure set in 1920's Egypt where a treasure hunting Yank (played by Brendan Fraser) is confronted by a revived 3,000 year-old mummy whose evil powers seemingly know no bounds. The lavishly shot action movie is stuffed with spooky special effects and comical moments that downplay horror in favor of rousing, old-fashioned entertainment. May 1999

  • 6.   ENTRAPMENT
      (20th Century Fox)    $79.4 million in seven weeks
            Because of a romanticized view of crime, fleeting violence and a few instances of rough language and profanity, the U.S. Catholic Conference classification is A-IV, adults, with reservations. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is PG-13 -- parents are strongly cautioned that some material may be inappropriate for children under 13. "Entrapment" is a mindless escapist caper in which a wily insurance investigator (played by Catherine Zeta-Jones) appears to join forces with the world's craftiest art thief (played by Sean Connery) to nail him red-handed. The glossy fantasy of double-crossing daredevils is sluggishly directed which limits the suspense. April 1999

  • 7.   THE MATRIX
      (Warner Brothers)     $161.4 million in eleven weeks
            Because of excessive violence and recurring profanity, the U.S. Catholic Conference classification, O -- morally offensive. Motion Picture Association of America rating, R -- restricted The Matrix is a convoluted sci-fi tale in which a tiny band of cyber rebels led by Keanu Reeves and Laurence Fishburne do battle with virtually indestructible humanoid killers from the 22nd centry. The action movie's violence is glorified, glamorized and made to look exciting with a dazzling array of eyepopping special effects. April 1999

  • 8.   THE THIRTEENTH FLOOR
      (Sony)    $9.7 million in three weeks
            Because of sporadic nasty violence, some sexual innuendo, intermittent rough language and a few instances of profanity, the U.S. Catholic Conference classification is A-III -- adults. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is R -- restricted. "The Thirteenth Floor" is a densely plotted sci-fi thriller involving a murder in parallel worlds, including Los Angeles 1937 and the present, with characters slipping between dimensions as they search for one true reality. The convoluted tale plays intriguing mind games with viewers until the weakly constructed climax goes over the top then ends unconvincingly. May-June 1999.

  • 9.   TEA WITH MUSSOLINI
      (MGM)    $7.7 million in one week
            Because of some threatening situations, sexual references and a few instances of coarse language the U.S. Catholic Conference classification is A-II adults and adolescents. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is PG -- parental guidance suggested. "Tea with Mussolini" is a warmly nostalgic tale in which several art-loving English matrons (played by Maggie Smith, Joan Plowright and Judi Dench) residing in 1930's Florence care for an abandoned boy who returns as a teen to help when they are interned as enemy aliens during World War II. While it shows how the Italian youth lad comes to appreciate English culture what succeeds best is the gently humorous depiction of the women, including their two brassy American pals (Cher and Lily Tomlin) and how they manage to survive the tragic circumstances of wartime Italy. May 1999

  • 10.   NEVER BEEN KISSED
      (Fox)    $51.9 million in ten weeks
            Because of implied affairs and sexual references, a sex-education scene involving condoms and occasional profanity, the U.S. Catholic Conference classification is A-III -- adults. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is PG-13 -- parents are strongly cautioned that some material may be inappropriate for children under 13. "Never Been Kissed" is a bogus romantic comedy in which 25-year old rookie reporter Drew Barrymore goes undercover as a high school senior to write about teen life and ends up reliving her adolescent insecurities before winning the heart of her English teacher. Movie cliches and stereotypes abound, and Barrymore's clunky performance further sinks the contrived coming-of-age tale. April 1999
    Reviews provided through Film & Broadcasting Division of the National Conference of Catholic Bishops and figures provided through Exhibitor Relations Co. Inc.

    SIMPLY SHEEN:
    Size doesn't matter, only eternity does!

       They say a picture is worth a thousand words, but the words of Bishop Fulton J. Sheen have been known to launch a thousand images in one's mind, one of the ways this late luminary did so much to evangelize the faith. Because of the urgency of the times and because few there are today who possess the wisdom, simplicity and insight than the late Archbishop who touched millions, we are bringing you daily gems from his writings. The good bishop makes it so simple that we have dubbed this daily series: "SIMPLY SHEEN".

    " There is a tendency today to believe that because the universe is far greater than we suspected, God perhaps is less perfect than we believed. This is part of the bad logic of Americans who judge the value of everything by its size. The truer point of view is that the greater the universe, the more certain man is to have his fretful mind lifted up to the thought of God's eternal Presence and Power."


    May 25th Medjugorje Monthly Message

        Dear children! Also today I call you to convert and to more firmly believe in God. Children, you seek peace and pray in different ways, but you have not yet given your hearts to God for Him to fill them with His love. So, I am with you to teach you and to bring you closer to the love of God. If you love God above all else, it will be easy for you to pray and to open your hearts to Him. Thank you for having responded to my call.
    For more on Medjugorje, click on MEDJUGORJE AND MORE

    DAILY WORD

    "And do not be afraid of those who kill the body but cannot kill the soul. But rather be afraid of him who is able to destroy both soul and body in hell."

    Matthew 11: 28


    Click here to go to SECTION TWO and SECTION THREE or click here to return to the graphics front page of this issue.


    June 18-20, 1999 volume 10, no. 118   DAILY CATHOLIC