THURSDAY
November 21, 2002
volume 13, no. 141

The Germs of G.I.R.M.



Part Fifty-Nine: Doing the Bugnini Shuffle

    "And the acclamation of the faithful following the Consecration of the Host and the Chalice gives the impression, as many others have noted, that the assent of the faithful is necessary for the validity of the Consecration. In short, the concoction of the Consilium headed by Archbishop Bugnini, the notorious Freemason, has rendered the central part of the Mass as little more than a "remembrance" of a 'banquet' which took place once in history, not the unbloody representation of Calvary."

Paragraphs 143-146 of GIRM read as follows:

    143: "After placing the chalice on the altar, the priest bows profoundly and says inaudibly: With humble and contrite hearts."

    144: "If incense is used, the priest puts some in the censer and incenses the gifts, the cross and the altar. A minister, standing at the side of the altar, incenses the priest and then the people."

    145: "After the prayer, With humble and contrite hearts, or after the incensation, the priest washes his hands at the side of the altar and says inaudibly, a the minister pours the water: Lord, wash away my iniquity; cleanse me from my sin."

    146: "The priest returns to the middle of the altar, and facing the people and first extending and then joining his hands, he invites the people to pray: Pray, brothers and sisters. The people stand and make their response: May the Lord accept this sacrifice. Then the priest, with his hands outstretched, says the prayer over the gifts. At the end the people make the acclamation, Amen."

Comment and Analysis: All of this has been commented upon at earlier points of this continuing analysis. Once again, GIRM describes the rubrics for a re-named and much simplified version of the traditional Offertory. Some of the rubrics (such as the incensation) remain pretty much the same. However, the language of tradition had to be altered radically so as to reflect the new religion. The Secret was re-named the Prayer Over the Gifts. Words count. Revolutionaries seek to use verbal engineering as a means of achieving their ideological ends, as the late Archbishop Annibale Bugnini and his cohorts sought to do when radically altering this part of the Mass.

Paragraph 147 of GIRM reads as follows:

    "Then the priest begins the Eucharistic Prayer. In accordance with the rubrics, he selects a Eucharistic Prayer from those found in the Roman Missal or approved by the Holy See. The Eucharistic Prayer demands, by its very nature, that the priest alone in virtue of his ordination proclaim it. For their part, the people associate themselves with the priest in silent faith, as well as by the prescribed acclamations in the Eucharistic Prayer, which are their responses in the Preface dialogue, the Sanctus, the acclamation after the consecration and the great Amen after the final doxology, and also other acclamations approved by the Conference of Bishops and confirmed by the Holy See. It is especially fitting that the priest sing those parts of the Eucharistic Prayer which are provided with musical notation."

Comment and Analysis: Prior to 1969 there was only one "Eucharistic Prayer" in the Roman Rite: The Roman Canon, parts of which date back to the first century, as noted by Father Joseph Jungmann in his study of the history of the Roman Rite. The addition of other prayers, some of which (especially Eucharistic Prayer II) are deficient in that they minimize the sacrificial nature of the Consecration, has made the central part of the Sacrifice of Calvary an utter mockery. Some of the Eucharistic Prayers for Reconciliation and for "Children's Masses" are insipid, replete with vocal participation by the faithful during the Eucharistic prayers. And the acclamation of the faithful following the Consecration of the Host and the Chalice gives the impression, as many others have noted, that the assent of the faithful is necessary for the validity of the Consecration. In short, the concoction of the Consilium headed by Archbishop Bugnini, the notorious Freemason, has rendered the central part of the Mass as little more than a "remembrance" of a "banquet" which took place once in history, not the unbloody representation of Calvary.

   Paragraphs 148 and 149 of GIRM deal with rubrics to be used by a priest during the Preface and during the Eucharistic Prayer when reference is made to the name of the diocesan bishop and to the Pope. Apart from the fact that the Eucharistic Prayer is prayed audibly in the new Mass, these two paragraphs are relatively non-controversial. The only notable difference between the Mass of tradition and the new Mass is that the Sanctus is prayed aloud by the people in the new Mass whereas the priest prays it alone in Low Masses in the Traditional Latin Mass. Obviously, the Sanctus is sung by a choir/schola and the people in High Masses in the Traditional Latin Mass.

Paragraph 150 of GIRM reads as follows:

    "A little before the consecration, a minister may ring a bell as a signal to the faithful. Depending on local custom, the minister also rings the bell at the showing of both the Eucharistic bread and the chalice. If incense is used, a minister incenses the host and the chalice when they are shown to the people after the consecration."

Comment and Analysis: It is the traditional of the Latin rite that a bell is rung at the Quam oblationem in The Roman Canon just prior to the Consecration. No bell is rung if no alter server is present, obviously. If one is present, however, the traditional rubrics mandate, not merely suggest, the ringing of a bell.

   Once more, though, GIRM demonstrates its schizophrenic nature. The Host is referred to both by its proper name and by the phrase "Eucharistic bread." This is so typical of postconciliar documents. Allusions to tradition while at the same time novelties are employed to express an "updated" theology.

Paragraph 151 of GIRM reads as follows:

    "After the consecration when the priest has said: The mystery of faith, the people make an acclamation taken from one of the prescribed formulas. At the end of the Eucharistic Prayer, the priest raises the paten with the host and the chalice and he alone makes the doxology: Through him. At the conclusion the people acclaim: Amen. Then the priest places the paten and the chalice on the corporal."

Comment and Analysis: These acclamations are Protestant in their origin. Their inclusion in a Catholic Mass is nothing less than sacrilegious. Indeed, writers of the Catholic counter-reformation condemned such acclamations by the people in the context of the consecration. It is more than a little significant that the phrase Mysterium Fidei is taken out of the words of the consecration of the wine in the Chalice and used now as an invitation to the people to "participate" in the Eucharistic prayer.

Thomas A. Droleskey, Ph.D.


For past installments of G.I.R.M. Warfare in The DAILY CATHOLIC by Dr. Droleskey, see Archives



THURSDAY
November 21, 2002
volume 13, no. 141
The Germs of G.I.R.M.
www.DailyCatholic.org

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