SUNDAY-SATURDAY
Third Week of Advent
December 15-21, 2002
volume 13, no. 147

The Germs of G.I.R.M.



Part Sixty-Two: Options make the Sacrificial Nature of the Mass Obsolete

    " As we know only too well, the official ending of most Novus Ordo Masses is, "Have a nice day now." Options, options, options. In the Traditional Latin Mass, the following dismissal is given (except in Masses where the Gloria has not been prayed during Lent): Ite, Misse est. The server responds: Deo gratias. Again, stability and permanence as opposed to impermanence, instability and idiosycrancy."

Paragraphs 164-165 of GIRM read as follows:

    164: "Afterwards, the priest may return to the chair. A period of silence may now be observed, or a psalm or canticle of praise or another hymn may be sung (see n. 88)."

    165: "Then, standing at the altar or at the chair, and facing the people, the priest says: Let us pray. There may be a brief period of silence, unless this has been already observed immediately after communion. With hands outstretched, he recites the Prayer after Communion, and at the end of which the people make the acclamation Amen."

Comment and Analysis: In other words, a priest has the option of returning to the chair after the distribution of Holy Communion, yet another Protestant novelty introduced by Bugnini and his gang. Silence "may" be observed. However, some insipid song may also be sung after Communion. Gone are the traditional Communion and Postcommunion prayers, which in the Traditional Latin Mass expressed so beautifully and fully the truths of the faith.

    No, the Communion prayer has been replaced by the Communion verse, which itself may be omitted if a Communion song is played as the faithful receive Holy Communion. Everything in the new Mass revolves around giving the celebrant options, the exact opposite of what a liturgical rite is supposed to produce (stability and permanence, constituent elements of reverence and solemnity).

Paragraph 166 of GIRM reads as follows:

    "If there are any brief announcements, they may be made at this time."

Comment and Analysis: As noted in an earlier installment, these announcements, which used to be made before a sermon or a homily, sometimes become moments for maudlin outbursts of applause as the "presider" thanks the choir or the reader or whoever comes to mind at that moment for something or another. They are entirely inappropriate as the priest prepares to administer the final blessing to the faithful.

Paragraph 167 of GIRM reads as follows:

    "Then the priest, extending his hands, greets the people: the Lord be with you. They answer: And also with you. The priest, joining his hands and then immediately placing his left hand upon his breast, elevates his right hand and says: May almighty God bless you and, as he blesses with the sign of the cross, continues: the Father, and the Son, and the Holy Spirit. All answer: Amen. On certain days and occasions another, more solemn form of blessing or the prayer over the people precedes this from of blessing as the rubrics direct. A Bishop blesses the people with the appropriate formula, making the sign of the cross three times over the people."

Comment and Analysis: Have you ever heard a priest conclude Mass by saying, "May Almighty God bless us. . . .?" This is more common than you may think, and it is a grave abuse. A priest is an administrator of God's blessings. He is the blessor, we are the blessees. However, above and beyond this abuse, the final blessing in the Traditional Latin Mass (which is not given in Requiem Masses and on a few other occasions) is fixed. It beautifully summarizes the essence of the Mass, as I demonstrated in an earlier installment in this series.
Placeat tibi, sancta Trinitas, obsequium servitutis meae: et praesta: ut sacrificium, quod oculis tuae majestatis indignus obtuli, tibi sit acceptabile, mihique et omnibus, pro quibus illud obtuli, sit, te miserante, propitiabile. Per Christum Dominum nostrum. Amen.

Benedicat vos omnipotens Deus, Pater, et Filius, + et Spiritus Sanctus. AMEN.

May the performance of my homage be pleasing to Thee, O holy Trinity: and grant that the Sacrifice which I, though unworthy, have offered up in the sight of Thy Majesty, may be acceptable to Thee, and through Thy mercy, be a propitiation for me, and for all those for whom I have offered it. Through Christ our Lord. Amen.

May almighty God the Father, Son, + and Holy Ghost, bless you. AMEN.

There are no options. We are reminded in each Mass of the very nature of the Sacrifice we have been privileged to participate in as unworthy sinners.

Paragraph 168 of GIRM reads as follows:

    "Immediately after the blessing, with hands joined, the priest adds: Go in the peace of Christ, or: Go, in peace to love and serve the Lord, or: the Mass is ended, go in peace, and the people answer: Thanks be to God."

Comment and Analysis: As we know only too well, the official ending of most Novus Ordo Masses is, "Have a nice day now." Options, options, options. In the Traditional Latin Mass, the following dismissal is given (except in Masses where the Gloria has not been prayed during Lent): Ite, Misse est. The server responds: Deo gratias. Again, stability and permanence as opposed to impermanence, instability and idiosycrancy.

Paragraphs 169-170 of GIRM read as follows:

    169: "As usual, the priest venerates the altar with a kiss, then makes a profound bow with the lay ministers and leaves with them."

    170: "If another liturgical service follows the Mass, the concluding rite (greeting, blessing, and dismissal) is omitted."

Comment and Analysis: GIRM assumes as a matter of preference that lay ministers will be in the sanctuary (apart from altar boys, that is). Furthermore, the Last Gospel has been omitted, that wonderful reminder to us of the fact that the Word became Flesh, and dwelt amongst us, that wonderful reminder to us that just as the Word became Incarnate in Our Lady's virginal and immaculate womb, so does He become incarnate for us under the appearance of bread and wine in the Sacrifice of the Mass. Our being reminded of the Incarnation makes us ready at all times to live in the shadow of the Holy Cross, mindful of the fact that we might be called this very day to make an account of our lives before the King of Kings and Lord of Lords. However, all of this is too much for modern man and a Mass composed by those who believed themselves to be the equal of God Himself.

    To be continued. We will pass the halfway mark in this continuing analysis with my installments beginning in 2003.

Thomas A. Droleskey, Ph.D.


For past installments of G.I.R.M. Warfare in The DAILY CATHOLIC by Dr. Droleskey, see Archives



SUNDAY-SATURDAY
Third Week of Advent Issue
December 15-21, 2002
volume 13, no. 147
The Germs of G.I.R.M.
www.DailyCatholic.org

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