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April 12-14, 2002
volume 13, no. 70

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The Humanism of John Paul II

Part Two:
The Assisi Interfaith Prayer Scandals - II

    What could the Holy Father have been thinking in giving credence to false religions? A false peace?
    "May God bless Cardinal Giacomo Biffi, who refused to attend the Assisi 2002 meeting! There is at least one cardinal we know of that still treasures his Catholic faith more than obedience to the Pope. If the faith is being endangered like this, we must disobey and resist the Pope. Who knows what John Paul II is thinking when he does these things - objectively speaking, it doesn't matter. When the command comes from above, even as high up as the Pope, to join an interfaith meeting like that, we must disobey. For "we ought to obey God rather than men" (Acts 5:29)."

    None other than Christ our Lord said: "Woe to the world because of scandals. For it must needs be that scandals come: but nevertheless woe to that man by whom the scandal cometh" (St. Matthew 18:7). Has anybody ever counted the number of scandals we've had to endure since the election of Pope John XXIII? I think the first real scandal, besides the election of Cardinal Roncalli as Pope, was the encyclical Pacem in Terris (1963). It was then that the Masons felt they had really won a huge victory, and that John XXIII was the Pope that could ring in their long-awaited revolution, one that they had planned since the 19th century. Their plan to infiltrate the Catholic Church is outlined in their secret document collection "Alta Vendita," which ranges from 1820-1846, and which John Vennari of the Catholic Family News has beautifully exposed in his booklet The Permanent Instruction of the Alta Vendita, published by and available from TAN Books.

    "The goal [of Freemasonry] is no longer the destruction of the Church, but to make use of it by infiltrating it," said Yves Marsaudon, a Freemason who wrote a book about ecumenism. The same made clear that Vatican II and the change in the Church had the full endorsement of the Freemasonic societies: "With all our hearts we wish for the successful outcome of John XXIII's revolution" (see Rudolf Graber, Athanasius and the Church of our Time, translated by Susan Johnson, Christian Book Club of America, n.d.).

    I feel I need not mention just how vehemently the Church has condemned Freemasonry before John XXIII. Numerous encyclicals have been written about it, denouncing it as satanic and evil, for such it is. Until 1983, Freemasons were automatically excommunicated from the Catholic Church, because one cannot be a Freemason and a Catholic at the same time.

    The endorsement of John XXIII and his "updating" of the Church, and the sheer joy the Masons must have had with the election and papacy of Paul VI are evidence enough that the direction of the Church today is abominable. Masons are pagans and satanists, and if they rejoice over what is happening to the Church today, we know with absolute certitude that it can't be right. The traditionalist position is greatly vindicated by the fact that the archenemies of the Church are rejoicing-though the traditionalist position can, of course, be entirely justified even without considering what the Masons have to say.

    Keeping these things in mind, one must be even more scandalized at the interfaith meetings of Assisi, since they demonstrate just how much and how far the Masonic forces have penetrated our holy Church.

    So, what was the purpose of convoking two "interfaith" meetings at Assisi, one in 1986 and one in 2002? As I mentioned last week, John Paul II meant to bring about peace in the world - but he did so in the totally wrong way. His "peace" plan is based on "human dignity," one of the watchwords of his pontificate. But, said St. Pius X, "There is only one human dignity and that is Catholic dignity" (qtd. in Daniel Le Roux, Peter, Lovest Thou Me?, p.139). There can be no true peace without Christ, and there is no "authentic religious spirit" other than the Catholic spirit.

    I cannot help but conclude that underlying John Paul II's actions is a totally skewed theology, consisting of indifferentism, syncretism, and humanism. It seems to me that, unlike the Church before Vatican II, the current Pope thinks that "religion in itself" is a great good, a good at the service of man, who is the most important being. These are just my gut feelings. I cannot in any other way explain why one would gather together members of false and even satanic religions in order that they might pray to their false and evil gods to bring about "peace." There is no justification whatsoever for thinking that these false religions by their prayers and abominable sacrifices could bring about the peace of our Lord Jesus Christ. But if that's not the peace we're looking for and working towards, then whatever "peace" we desire, it is evil.

    In my opinion, the Pope has raised the peaceful existence of man above and beyond the service man must render to God. But peace is not the highest good! Our ultimate end, and this is the only thing that really matters, is the beatific vision of our Creator, being united to Him Who made and loves us. If we do not have this end in sight, we are working in vain. All things must, however proximately, be directed to this end. However, I think the Pope has made secular "peace" and end in itself, to be brought about by any means whatsoever, even the encouraging of false religions to offer petitions and sacrifices to a false deity.

    This is absolutely despicable and unacceptable! May God bless Cardinal Giacomo Biffi, who refused to attend the Assisi 2002 meeting! There is at least one cardinal we know of that still treasures his Catholic faith more than obedience to the Pope. If the faith is being endangered like this, we must disobey and resist the Pope. Who knows what John Paul II is thinking when he does these things - objectively speaking, it doesn't matter. When the command comes from above, even as high up as the Pope, to join an interfaith meeting like that, we must disobey. For "we ought to obey God rather than men" (Acts 5:29).

    [Please note that this is not a manifestation of a Protestant or rebellious spirit. To think that would mean to be ignorant of the nature of obedience and the nature of the Protestant Revolution (they call it "Reformation"). But I will discuss this in a future forthcoming series about Traditionalism and "schism."]

    So, it is with great sorrow but the obligation of my conscience that I must point out that, at least as far as pastoral action and direction is concerned, the Holy Father is objectively promoting the exultation of man over that of God. He is setting aside the dogmas and doctrines of the only true religion and going against the stern warnings of previous Pontiffs in order to at least apparently receive the approval and fellowship of men, whatever their beliefs and creeds may be.

    Earthly peace seems to be the highest good for John Paul II, and that is anathema. From what is objectively evidenced by his actions, peace with fellow-men is what he seeks; peace with God is not mentioned or simply considered irrelevant, because he feels he must do anything in his power that "human dignity" be not violated. But which God to we worship? Our Creator, Redeemer, and Sanctifier, or the "god" of human dignity?

    It was none other than Cardinal Eugenio Pacelli, the future Pope Pius XII, who prophesied that "A day will come . . . when the Church will . . . be tempted to believe that man has become God" (trans. from Roche & Saint Germain, Pie XII Devant L'Histoire, pp.52-53).

    Has this day now arrived? It seems so to me. Or, if not, we're certainly speedily heading towards it. When we hear a Pope talk about the "divine meaning of human life" (John Paul II, Homily on December 25, 1985), that "there is contained in the Eucharist that which the life of every man has most deeply" (John Paul II, Angelus message from May 29, 1983), and that the Church's social teaching "reveals man to himself" (John Paul II, Encyclical Centesimus Annus # 54) - then, my dear readers, I think it is fair to say that this day is not far off.

Mario Derksen

    Editor's Note: So many of the post-conciliar bishops today refer to those clinging to the true Roman Catholic traditions that were in vogue for 2000 years prior to the reforms of Vatican II as 'fossils,' 'dinosaurs,' 'old folks who will die off soon.' We beg to differ and offer as proof the youthful wisdom and enthusiasm of the younger generation in the Traditional Insights of Mario Derksen who exemplifies the thinking of many more young men and women today who realize the new thinking of the post-conciliar church does not add up to true Catholic teaching. Thus they long for those traditions so tried and true. His insight shows great promise, optimism and hope for the future of Holy Mother Church.


      Note: [editor's bold, brackets and italicized words used for emphasis]

For past columns by Mario Derksen, see Archives for www.DailyCatholic.org/2002mdi.htm



April 12-14, 2002
volume 13, no. 70
Mario Derksen's young and refreshing TRADITIONAL INSIGHTS
www.DailyCatholic.org
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