FRIDAY
May 4, 2001
volume 12, no. 124

Liturgy for Friday May 4th and 5th



Friday, May 4, 2001    Meditation

    Easter Weekday
    FIRST FRIDAY
    Feast of Saint Monica, Widow and Mother of Saint Augustine
      White vestments
Novus Ordo

Entrance: Apoc/Rev: 9: 1-20
First Reading: Acts 9: 1-20
Responsorial: Psalm 117: 1-2
Gospel Reading: John 6: 52-59

Ordinary of the Mass of the Catechumens*

Mass "Cognovi" - Common of a Holy Woman Not a Martyr:
Introit: Psalm 118: 75, 120
Epistle: 1 Timothy 5: 3-10
Alleluia: Psalm 198: 44: 3, 5
Gospel: Matthew 13: 44-52
Offertory: Psalm 44: 3
Communion: Psalm 44: 8

Feast of Saint Monica, Widow and devoted mother of Saint Augustine

   Celebrated in the new liturgy on August 27, the Traditional Liturgy has long celebrated this feast on May 4th. Born into a Christian family in the village of Tagaste, Northern Africa in 332, Saint Monica learned at an early age the virtues of patience and obedience which she exhibited throughout her lifetime. When she reached womanhood her parents married her off to a nobleman by the name of Patricius who was a kind husband, but possessed a terrible temper and a wanderlust which Monica tolerated because of her marriage vows. She tried to calm and win him over through her obedience and patience, always praying that he would realize the error of his ways and come to see the only answer was God. Her prayers were answered in 371 when Patricius received Baptism as he lay dying. This patient love and total faith in God's Providence was transfered from Patricius to their son Augustine who was 17 when his father died, leaving Monica a widow. Though Augustine had begun studying as a catechumen his father's genes took hold and her son opted for the world, also being led down the wrong path by Manichean heresy rationalizing that he wasn't responsible for his own free will. Oh, how wrong he was and Monica knew it, but rather than alienating her son she opened her arms to him using the psychology of catching more flies with honey than vinegar. But her loving protection backfired as Augustine fled to Italy to do his own thing. Monica would not see her son for 15 more years when, under the influence of Saint Ambrose, Augustine's heart and mind finally discovered the truth and invited his mother to Ostia, Italy in 387 where, on Easter Sunday at the age of 33, Augustine was finally baptized into the true faith and a mother's patient prayers were finally answered. It had been her dying wish to see him come back to the Church and shortly after she passed on to her heavenly reward in the same year. Little did Monica realize how powerful were her prayers and what a gift her son would give back to Holy Mother Church as a great Doctor who had been tutored by another great Doctor of the Church St. Ambrose. Monica has become the role model for mothers everywhere especially mothers who have wayward children or offspring that have fallen away. Persevering prayer does indeed pay off, not necessarily in our timetable but in God's time. That is where patience and obedience play such a vital role. In 1586 St. Monica was officially added to the Roman Calendar by Pope Sixtus V and her relics were moved from Ostia to the church of St. Augustine where her son's relics rested and once again mother and son were reunited on earth as they were reunited in Heaven on Augustine's death in 430 AD.


Saturday, May 4, 2001    Meditation

    Easter Weekday
    Feast of Saint Nereus, Achilleus and Pancras, Martyrs Traditional Feast of Pope Saint Pius V
    FIRST SATURDAY
      White or Red vestments
Novus Ordo

Entrance: Apoc/Rev 5: 12
First Reading: Acts 9: 1-20
Responsorial: Psalm 117: 1-2
Gospel Reading: John 6: 52-59
Communion: John 14: 8-9

Ordinary of the Mass of the Catechumens*

Mass "Si Diligis Me" - Common of One or Several Holy Popes:
Introit: John 21: 51-17
Epistle: 1 Peter 5: 1-4, 10-11
Alleluia: Matthew 16: 18
Gospel: Matthew 16: 13-19
Offertory: Matthew 16: 18

Feast of Pope Saint Pius V

    A Dominican who followed in the tradition of St. Catherine of Siena nearly two centuries later was Cardinal Michael Ghislieri who went on to become the great Pope Saint Pius V. Another of the great saints who God rose up in the "Century of Saints," Pius V was one of the most influential in Church history as he brought about renewal in the Church, carrying out many of the reforms that would reinstate the holiness and status of Holy Mother Church. Amidst the ruin of the Protestant Reformation, the corruption within the Church, and the threat of Turkish invasion, Pius carried out the teachings of the Council of Trent which had begun in 1545. The fruits of Trent are still evident today for Pius ordered the founding of seminaries for the training of priests, published a new Missal, Breviary, Catechism and initiated the Confraternity of Christian Doctrine (CCD) for the youth to learn the faith. In addition, he established the Tridentine Mass which he proclaimed would be said "in perpetuity." His devotion to the Rosary and spreading the power of Our Lady's special weapon, proved victorious when he summoned all Catholics to throw themselves upon the Mercy of God and pray the Holy Rosary in begging God to save the Church from the Turks. On October 7, 1571 against unsurmountable odds, the Christian forces were miraculously victorious over the Turks in the Gulf of Lepanto off of Greece. The tremendous power of the Rosary was made manifest and that date became the official feast of Our Lady of the Rosary. Pius died in 1572.

* = Traditional Latin Mass promulgated by Pope St. Pius V to be said in perpetuity


May 4, 2001
volume 12, no. 124
DAILY LITURGY
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