FRI-SAT-SUN
January 14-16, 2000
volume 11, no. 10
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NEWS & VIEWS     Acknowledgments
Articles provided through Catholic World News and Church News at Noticias Eclesiales and International Dossiers, Daily Dispatches and Features at ZENIT International News Agency. CWN, NE and ZENIT are not affiliated with the Daily CATHOLIC but provide this service via e-mail to the Daily CATHOLIC Monday through Friday.

U.S. FIGHTS AIDS AND FUNDS WARS IN AFRICA

Vatican Agency "Fides" Denounces Washington's Contradictions

    VATICAN CITY, JAN 13 (ZENIT).- The Gospel phrase "don't let your right hand know what your left is doing," aptly describes U.S. policy in Africa, according to the Holy See's missionary agency "Fides."

    "Fides" published its rebuttal following an announcement Vice-President Al Gore that he is committed to give additional funds for the struggle against AIDS.

    Gore said at the United Nations that, beyond the $225 million allocated to fight this illness that undermines the future of Africa, he will request an additional $100 million from Congress to assist those countries lacerated by this virus. During the current year 2000, the United States will invest over $800 million to combat this virus. This is a major decision, given the fact that in 1998 Washington drastically cut funds for humanitarian aid.

    However, according to recent research by the organization "Demilitarization for Democracy," the Clinton Administration has allocated $21.3 billion for armaments, of which $8.3 billion have been allocated to non-democratic regimes.

    "Fides" reports that last November the African Center for Strategic Studies was founded in Dakar, Senegal. This is the name of a combat school, created by the U.S. Defense Department. The center is open to high-level military officers and African civilian leaders. Courses will be taught by retired U.S. officers, who in the past participated in similar undertakings in Latin America, which gave birth to a controversial generation of military leaders.

    Registration in this military institution is handled through U.S. Embassies in the African countries. The only countries excluded are those sanctioned by a U.N. embargo or those suspected of funding terrorism. These limitations do not affect leaders of regimes at war or representatives of dictatorships.

    According to the organization "Demilitarization for Democracy," 43 African countries, 26 with non-democratic governments, have U.S. military advisers. In 1997, nine of the eleven countries involved in the civil war in the Democratic Republic of the Congo received arms and instructors from the United States. ZE00011301

          

January 14-16, 2000
volume 11, no. 10
NEWS & VIEWS

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