TUESDAY
SOLEMNITY OF THE ASSUMPTION
August 15, 2000
volume 11, no. 141


LITURGY for Tuesday, August 15th, 2000 - SOLEMNITY OF THE ASSUMPTION OF MARY INTO HEAVEN

TUESDAY, August 15, 2000

    TUESDAY August 15:
    SOLEMNITY OF THE ASSUMPTION OF THE BLESSED VIRGIN MARY INTO HEAVEN

    White vestments

      First Reading: Revelations/Apocalypse 11: 19; 12: 1-6, 10
      Psalms: Psalm 45: 10-12, 16
      Second Reading: 1 Corinthians 15: 20-27
      Gospel Reading: Luke 1: 39-56
SOLEMNITY OF THE ASSUMPTION OF THE BLESSED VIRGIN MARY INTO HEAVEN
        This feast celebrates the glorious Assumption into Heaven of the Blessed Virgin Mary. It was first called the "Dormition of Mary" in reference to Our Lady having supposedly "died" at her home in Ephesus. She was obeying the law of death, howver her death was not truly death as we know it but a 'gentle separation of the soul from the body' where her soul had reached such a level of love that it could no longer rest unless it was truly in the celestial bliss of the Triune Divinity. Thus her soul vacated her immaculate body to be reunited with her Son Jesus. But God so deigned that her immaculate body would be reunited with her immaculate soul so that He could raise her up body and soul into Heaven to be accorded the honors she had merited. The Apostle Saint John discovered her veil wafting to the earth from the sky and where her body had been lain were only beautiful flowers with heavenly music enveloping her tomb. He, along with the other Apostles and disciples, assumed correctly that she had been assumed into Heaven to be with her Divine Son. There is nothing in Sacred Scripture regarding thisspecific event but the Church has relied heavily on 2 Corinthians 5: 1 as well as tradition and private revelation to document her Assumption. This is specially true from the messages received by Saint Gregory of Tours in 549 and further substantiated by Saint Bridget of Sweden and Blessed Catherine Emmerich. The feast was first commemorated in 451 in the East and established as a feast for the entire Roman empire in 602 by the Emperor Maurice. It was grouped together with the feast of the Theotokos, Mother of God on January 1. In the 8th Century it was first given the official title of "Assumption of Mary" as found in the Gregorian Sacramentary. The Church commemorated this feast with a midnight procession from St. Adrian's in Rome to the Basilica of St. Mary Major. It wasn't until this century however, that the Church officially proclaimed Our Lady's Assumption as Dogma. That was done by Pope Pius XII on November 1, 1950 after a four-year study in which the pontiff had polled all the Catholic Bishops of the world. Their response was overwhelmingly favorable. In his encyclical Munificentissimus Deus Pius XII stated, "The august Mother of God...gained at last the supreme crown of her privileges - to be preserved immune from the corruption of the tomb and, like her Son, when death had been conquered, to be carried up body and soul to the exalted glory of Heaven." Pius XII's decree put the exclamation mark on what Pope Alexander II had stated in the 12th Century: "Mary conceived without detriment to her virginal modesty, brought forth her Son without pain, passed hence without decay, according to the word of the angel, or rather God speaking by the angel, that she might be shown to be full, not half-full of grace." This was a confirmation of Luke 1: and 1 John 3: 9 that the 'Mother of God was "full of grace" and could not be perfect as God foretold unless she remained incorruptible (cf 1 Corinthians 15: 54-57).' For prayers to Our Lady on her Assumption, please see Devotions on the Assumption.

August 15, 2000
volume 11, no. 141
DAILY LITURGY



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