Missa "Factum est"
Second Sunday After Pentecost
"Bring in hither the poor and the feeble."


Sunday Within the Octave of Corpus ChristiObservance of the Second Sunday After Pentecost

    Missa "Factus est"

    WHITE Vestments



       

    Wherever the solemn celebration of Corpus Christi is observed on the Sunday, one high Mass is celebrated as on the feast itself, with commemoration and last Gospel of the second Sunday. After this Mass the procession takes place. For the feast of Corpus Christi, the Church has chosen the Thursday between the Sunday on which she speaks of God's mercy towards men and the consequent duty of fraternal charity among Christians (First Sunday after Pentecost), and this Sunday when she resumes the same thread of thought (Epistle) and presents the Kingdom of Heaven in the form of the Parable of the Supper(Gospel).

        Nothing could be more appropriate to the Blessed Eucharist, as the banquet where all souls are united by love to Christ their Spouse and to all the members of His mystical body; no time could have been chosen better than when the history of Samuel is being read in the breviary; Samuel who was consecrated to God from his earliest childhood to dwell near the Ark of the Lord and to become priest in the sanctuary of the Most High.

        In the liturgy for this season we see how this young child, offered to God by his mother, served the Lord in the Temple with a pure heart and nurtured himself on God's truth.

        "In those days," the breviary tells us, "the word of the Lord was precious... there was no manifest vision"; for Heli was at the same time proud and weak; and his two sons Ophni and Phinees were faithless to God and slack in His service. Yet at that very moment the Lord revealed Himself to the child Samuel, for as our Lord tells us, He reveals Himself to "little ones", and hides Himself from the proud.

        "It is to the humble," says St. Gregory, "that the secrets of the divine plan have been revealed, and that is why Samuel was called as a child2". God foretold to Samuel the punishment which would fall on Heli and his house, and as a matter of fact soon after, the Ark was taken by the Philistines, Heli's two sons were killed and Heli himself died. Moreover almighty God had withheld his revelations from the high priest, because he and his sons made too little of heavenly joys, symbolized by "the great supper" spoken of in today's Gospel, and were more attached to the delights of the body than of the soul.

        Applying to them a passage from St. Gregory in today's homily we may say that they "had reached a state in which they had lost all appetite for interior joys, for the very reason that they had held aloof from them and had long lost the habit of relishing them. Since they were not willing to enjoy interiorly the sweetness offered them, they loved the hunger that came upon them from without."

        Heli's sons had in fact been taking the meats offered to God and eating them themselves and Heli, their father had let them go their own way. It was in divine consolations alone that Samuel, who had always lived with Heli in the Temple, found his delight. The food of which he partook was that supplied by God Himself, when He told him His secrets in contemplation and prayer. "The child slept, which means," says St. Gregory, "that his soul was at rest without care for earthly things." The saint explains in his commentary on today's Gospel that "the joys of the body which kindle in us beforehand an ardent desire for their possession, soon bring disgust upon him who tastes them, by the very fact of his satiating himself with them, while on the contrary, spiritual joys arouse contempt before they are possessed, but stir up desire for them when once they have been obtained; so that he who has tasted them is the hungrier, the more he is fed".

        And this explains how souls who find all their delight in the pleasures of this world refuse to share in the banquet of the Christian Faith, wherein the church nourishes all with the teaching of the Gospel. "Taste and see," continues St. Gregory, "that the Lord is sweet". By these words the Psalmist expressly tells us: You do not know His sweetness if you do not taste it, but touch the food of life with the palate of your heart, that experiencing His graciousness you may be able to love Him.

        "Man lost these delights when he sinned in paradise, out of which he came when he had closed his lips to the food of eternal sweetness. It follows from this that having been born in the pains of this exile, we reach such a state of disgust with our life here below, that we no longer know what we ought to desire" (Matins).

        But by the grace of the Holy Ghost, "we have passed from death unto life", (Epistle), so that, like humble little Samuel, we, the weak, the poor and the lame of the Gospel should seek our joys near our Lord's tabernacle and in intimate communion with Him. We must avoid pride and earthly things that we may be instructed in the fear and love of Gods Holy Name (Collect), and thus constantly directed by Him "our life on earth may more and more be likened to that of heaven," that "it may be vouchsafed to us who have received the sacred gifts, that the more often we assist at the celebration of these divine mysteries, the more surely they may avail to the salvation of our souls" (Postcommunion).

      We want to thank the Friends of Our Lady of Fatima for expediting these resources of the Propers. Sources: Saint Andrew Daily Missal and the Marian Missal , 1945


Comprehensive Catholic Commentary
by
Fr. George Leo Haydock
provided by
John Gregory

    John Gregory provides the commentary for the Second Sunday after Pentecost from Father George Leo Haydock found in many Douay-Rheims version of the New Testament. In the short, the powerfully poignant and pertinent words in today's paragraphs from our Lord's mouth give us knowledge that He reaches out to the most disadvantage of souls for His mercy knows no bounds, but those who reject Him, who decide they do not want to partake at His banquet will find no comfort nor a place at the table. Wise words for those who are starving for the true Faith and feel the emptiness in the novus ordo. Leave the scraps and rotting menu of misery and come to the true banquet - the Traditional Latin Mass where the Holy Sacrifice is celebrated by true priests, men who have not rejected Christ's invitation. True Catholics do not hate their neighbor but love him out of their love for God as St. Paul relates in today's Epistle and one who has such love wants his neighbor to partake in the banquet offered by the Lord.


    Second Sunday after Pentecost

    Epistle: 1 St. John 3: 13-18

    13 Wonder not, brethren, if the world hate you.

    14 We know that we have passed from death to life, because we love the brethren. He that loveth not, abideth in death.

    15 Whosoever hateth his brother is a murderer. And you know that no murderer hath eternal life abiding in himself.

      Commentary on Verses 14-15: We know that we have passed from death to life; i.e. from the death of sin to the life of grace: we know it by a moral certainty, when we experience in our heart a love of our neighbor. He that loveth not God and his neighbor, abideth in death. He that hateth his brother with a mortal hatred, or to a considerable degree, is a murderer.

    16 In this we have known the charity of God, because He hath laid down His life for us: and we ought to lay down our lives for the brethren.

      Commentary on Verse 16: The charity of God, because He hath laid down His life for us. Jesus Christ, therefore, who laid down His life for us, was God. It is true at present the words of God are wanting in most Greek MSS., yet the Prot. Translation has them.

    17 He that hath the substance of this world, and shall see his brother in need, and shall shut up his bowels from him: how doth the charity of God abide in him?

    18 My little children, let us not love in word, nor in tongue, but in deed, and in truth.


    Gospel: St. Luke 14: 16-24

    16 But He said to him: A certain man made a great supper, and invited many.

      Commentary on Verse 16: By this man we are to understand Christ Jesus, the great mediator between God and man. He sent his servants, at supper-time, to say to them that were invited, that they should come; i.e. He sent His apostles to call the people of Israel, who had been invited to His supper on almost innumerable occasions: but they not only refused the invitation, but also murdered the Lord who had invited them. We may remark, that the three different excuses exactly agree with what St. John says: All that is in the world is the concupiscence of the flesh, and concupiscence of the eyes, and the pride of life. The one says, I have married a wife, by which may be understood the concupiscence of the flesh; another says, I have bought five yoke of oxen, by which is denoted the concupiscence of the eyes; and the pride of life is signified by the purchase of the farm, which the third alleges in his justification. S. Aug. de verb. Dei.

    17 And he sent his servant at the hour of supper to say to them that were invited, that they should come, for now all things are ready.

    18 And they began all at once to make excuse. The first said to him: I have bought a farm, and I must needs go out and see it: I pray thee, hold me excused.

    19 And another said: I have bought five yoke of oxen, and I go to try them: I pray thee, hold me excused.

    20 And another said: I have married a wife, and therefore I cannot come.

    21 And the servant returning, told these things to his lord. Then the master of the house, being angry, said to his servant: Go out quickly into the streets and lanes of the city, and bring in hither the poor, and the feeble, and the blind, and the lame.

    22 And the servant said: Lord, it is done as thou hast commanded, and yet there is room.

    23 And the Lord said to the servant: Go out into the highways and hedges, and compel them to come in, that my house may be filled.

      Commentary on Verse 23: Compel them to come in. This is almost the only expression in the New Testament, which can give to the intolerant a plea for persecution. The spirit of the gospel is the spirit of mildness, and the compulsion which it authorizes to bring infidels or heretics into the Church, is such as we use towards our friends, when we press them to accept of our hospitality. The great pope, St. Gregory, forbade the Jews to be persecuted in Rome, who refused to receive the faith of Christ "That is a new and unheard of kind of preaching," says he, "which demands assent by stripes."

    24 But I say unto you, that none of those men that were invited, shall taste of My supper.