June 22, 2008
    SUNDAY
    vol 19, no. 174
Missa "Dóminus fortitúdo"
Sixth Sunday After Pentecost
Commemoration of St. Paulinus of Nola


Semi-Double Observance of the Sixth Sunday After Pentecost

Missa "Dóminus fortitúdo"

GREEN Vestments


   Holy Mother Church reminds us today of the effects of the two great Sacraments: Baptism and the Eucharist, which she has conferred at Easter and Whitsunday.

    Her mind being still occupied with the Sacraments of Baptism and Eucharist, which she has administered at Easter and at Pentecost, the Church reminds us today of the effects of these two great Sacraments.

    Dead through sin, we have been plunged and, as it were, buried with Jesus in the baptismal water. "All we who have been baptized," says St. Paul, "it is in His death that we have been baptized" (Epistle). By dying on the Cross He atoned for our sins, and "our evil nature was crucified with Him" (Epistle): we must therefore die to sin and no longer commit sin. "If we have died with Christ," continued the Apostle, "we believe that we shall live with Him." "Christ having risen from the dead, we must also walk in a new life."

    The Eucharist is the food of this divine life. The multiplication of loaves, related by St. Mark in today's Gospel, figured and announced this great Sacrament by which faithful souls are nourished. Jesus has compassion on the multitude and gives food to four thousand men, who without this sustenance "would have fainted on the way." "He took the seven loaves, gave thanks to God, broke them, and gave them to His disciples to distribute, and they distributed them among the people" (Gospel). This miracle expressly relates to the promise of the institution of the Blessed Sacrament. Wherefore, when Jesus fulfilled it at the Last Supper, St. Paul writes that "He took bread and giving thanks He broke, it and said: "Receive and eat : this is My Body." And in adding : "Do this in memory of Me," He ordered the Apostles and their successors to consecrate in the same way the supernatural broad which is to sustain our souls and to distribute it throughout the world and to the end of time.

    There is a commemoration today of St. Paulinus, who was Bishop of Nola in Southern Italy. He was born at Bordeaux about 354 and sprang from a distinguished family of Aquitania and his education was entrusted to the poet Ausonius. He became governor of the Province of Campania, but he soon realized that he could not find in public life the happiness he sought.

    From 380 to 390 he lived almost entirely in his native land. He married a Spanish lady, a Christian named Therasia. He owed his conversion to her, as well as to Bishop Delphinus of Bordeaux and his successor the Fr. Amandus, and to St. Martin of Tours, who had cured him of some disease of the eye, He and his brother were baptized at the same time by Delphinus. When Paulinus lost his only child eight days after birth, and when he was threatened with the charge of having murdered his brother, he and his wife decided to withdraw from the world, and to enter the monastic life. They went to Spain about 390.

    At Christmas, 394, or 395, the inhabitants of Barcelona obliged him to be ordained, which was not canonical as he had not previously received the other orders. Having had a special devotion to St. Felix, who was buried at Nola in Campania, he laid out a fine avenue leading to the church containing Felix's tomb, and beside it he erected a hospital. He decided to settle down there with Therasia; and he distributed the largest part of his possessions among the poor.

    In 395 he removed to Nola, where he led a rigorous, ascetic, and monastic life, at the same time contributing generously to the Church, the aqueduct at Nola, and the construction of basilicas in Nola, Fondi, etc. The basilica at Nola counted five naves and had on each side four additions or chapels (cubicula), and an apsis arranged in a clover shape. This was connected with the old mortuary chapel of St. Felix by a gallery. The side was richly decorated with marble, silver lamps and lustres, paintings, statuary, and inscriptions. In the apsis was a mosaic which represented the Blessed Trinity, and of which in 1512 some remnants were still found.

    About 409 Paulinus was chosen Bishop of Nola. For twenty years he discharged his duties in a most praiseworthy manner. His letters contain numerous biblical quotations and allusions; everything he performed in the Spirit of the Bible and expressed in Biblical language. Gennadius mentions the writings of Paulinus in his continuation of St. Jerome's "De Viris Illustribus" (xlix). Forty-nine letters to friends have been preserved, as those to Sulpicius Severus, St. Augustine, Delphinus, Bishop Victricius of Rouen, Desiderius, Amandus, and Pammachius among others. Thirty-three poems are also extant. After 395 he composed annually a hymn for the feast of St. Felix, in which he principally glorified the life, works, and miracles of his holy patron. Then going further back he brought in various religious and poetic motives. The epic parts are very vivid, the lyrics full of real, unaffected enthusiasm and an ardent appreciation of nature. Thirteen of these poems and fragments of the fourteenth have preserved.

    Conspicuous among his other works are the poetic epistles to Ausonius, the nuptial hymn to Julianus, which extols the dignity and sanctity of Christian marriage, and the poem of comfort to the parents of Celsus on the death of their child. Although Paulinus has great versatility and nicety, still he is not entirely free from the mannerisms and ornate culture of his period. All his writings breathe a charming, ideal personality, freed from all terrestrial attachments, ever striving upward. According to Augustine, he also had an exaggerated idea concerning the veneration of saints and relics.

    His letter xxxii, written to Sulpicius Severus, has received special attention because in it he describes the basilica of Nola, which he built, and gives copious accounts of the existence, construction, and purpose of Christian monuments. From Paulinus too we have information concerning St. Peter's in Rome. During his lifetime Paulinus was looked upon as saint. He died of natural causes on this day in 431. His body was first interred in the cathedral of Nola; later, in Benevento; then it was conveyed by Otto III to S. Bartolomeo all'Isola, in Rome, and finally in compliance with the regulation of Pope Pius X of 18 Sept., 1908 (Acta Apostolicae Sedis, I, 245 sq.) was restored to the cathedral of Nola and his feast raised to the rank of a double. (Source: Catholic Encyclopedia, 1911, newadvent.org)

   Though there is no commemoration for his feast, it is the historical feast of Saint John Fisher, the holy cardinal bishop of Rochester and the ONLY bishop who stood up to the apostate Henry VIII and gave his life for Christ and His true Church, the spotless bride. John was born at Beverley in Yorkshire, England in 1469. He was the eldest son of Robert Fisher, merchant of Beverley, and Agnes his wife. His early education was probably received in the school attached to the collegiate church in his native town, whence in 1484 he removed to Michaelhouse, Cambridge. He took the degree of B.A. in 1487, proceeded M.A. in 1491, in which year he was elected a fellow of his college, and was made Vicar of Northallerton, Yorkshire. In 1494 he resigned his benefice to become proctor of his university, and three years later was appointed Master of Michaelhouse, about which date he became chaplain and confessor to Margaret Beaufort, Countess of Richmond and Derby, mother of Henry VII. In 1501 he received the degree of D.D., and was elected Vice-Chancellor of Cambridge University. Under Fisher's guidance, the Lady Margaret founded St. John's and Christ's Colleges at Cambridge, and also the two "Lady Margaret" professorships of divinity at Oxford and Cambridge respectively, Fisher himself being the first occupant of the Cambridge chair.

    By a Bull dated October 14, 1504, Fisher was advanced to the Bishopric of Rochester, and in the same year was elected Chancellor of Cambridge University, to which post he was re-elected annually for ten years and then appointed for life. At this date also he is said to have acted as tutor to Prince Henry, afterwards Henry VIII. As a preacher his reputation was so great that in 1509, when King Henry VII and the Lady Margaret died, Fisher was appointed to preach the funeral oration on both occasions; these sermons are still extant. In 1512 Fisher was nominated as one of the English representatives at the Fifth Council of Lateran, then sitting, but his journey to Rome was postponed, and finally abandoned. Besides his share in the Lady Margaret's foundations, Fisher gave further proof of his genuine zeal for learning by inducing Erasmus to visit Cambridge. The latter indeed (Epist. 6:2) attributes it to Fisher's protection that the study of Greek was allowed to proceed at Cambridge without the active molestation that it encountered at Oxford. He has also been named, though without any real proof, as the true author of the royal treatise against Martin Luther entitled "Assertio septem sacramentorum", published in 1521, which won the title Fidei Defensor for Henry VIII. Before this date Fisher had denounced various abuses in the Church, urging the need of disciplinary reforms, and in this year he preached at St. Paul's Cross on the occasion when Luther's books were publicly burned.

    When the question of Henry's divorce from Queen Catherine arose, Fisher became the Queen's chief supporter and most trusted counsellor. In this capacity he appeared on the Queen's behalf in the legates' court, where he startled his hearers by the directness of his language and most of all by declaring that, like St. John the Baptist, he was ready to die on behalf of the indissolubility of marriage. This statement was reported to Henry VIII, who was so enraged by it that he himself composed a long Latin address to the legates in answer to the bishop's speech. Fisher's copy of this still exists, with his manuscript annotations in the margin which show how little he feared the royal anger.

    The removal of the cause to Rome brought Fisher's personal share therein to an end, but the king never forgave him for what he had done. In November, 1529, the "Long Parliament" of Henry's reign began its series of encroachments on the Church. Fisher, as a member of the upper house, at once warned Parliament that such acts could only end in the utter destruction of the Church in England. On this the Commons, through their speaker, complained to the king that the bishop had disparaged Parliament. Dr. Gairdner (Lollardy and the Reformation, I, 442) says of this incident "it can hardly be a matter of doubt that this strange remonstrance was prompted by the king himself, and partly for personal uses of his own".

    The opportunity was not lost. Henry summoned Fisher before him, demanding an explanation. This being given, Henry declared himself satisfied, leaving it to the Commons to declare that the explanation was inadequate, so that he appeared as a magnanimous sovereign, instead of Fisher's enemy.

    A year later (1530) the continued encroachments on the Church moved the Bishops of Rochester, Bath, and Ely to appeal to the Apostolic see. This gave the king his opportunity. An edict forbidding such appeals was immediately issued, and the three bishops were arrested. Their imprisonment, however, can have lasted a few months only, for in February, 1531, Convocation met, and Fisher was present. This was the occasion when the clergy were forced, at a cost of 1000,000 pounds, to purchase the king's pardon for having recognized Cardinal Wolsey's authority as legate of the pope; and at the same time to acknowledge Henry as Supreme Head of the Church in England, to which phrase, however, the addition "so far as God's law permits" was made, through Fisher's efforts.

    A few days later, several of the bishop's servants were taken ill after eating some porridge served to the household, and two actually died. Popular opinion at the time regarded this as an attempt on the bishop's life, although he himself chanced not to have taken any of the poisoned food. To disarm suspicion, the king not only expressed strong indignation at the crime, but caused a special Act of Parliament to be passed, whereby poisoning was to be accounted high treason, and the person guilty of it boiled to death. This sentence was actually carried out on the culprit, but it did not prevent what seems to have been a second attempt on Fisher's life soon afterwards.

    Matters now moved rapidly. In May of 1532, Sir Thomas More resigned the chancellorship, and in June, Fisher preached publicly against the divorce. In August, Warham, Archbishop of Canterbury, died, and Cranmer was at once nominated to the pope as his successor. In January, 1533, Henry secretly went through the form of marriage with Anne Boleyn; Cranmer's consecration took place in March of the same year, and, a week later, Fisher was arrested. It seems fairly clear that the purpose of this arrest was to prevent his opposing the sentence of divorce which Cranmer pronounced in May, or the coronation of Anne Boleyn which followed on 1 June; for Fisher was set at liberty again within a fortnight of the latter event, no charge being made against him.

    In the autumn of 1533, various arrests were made in connection with the so-called revelations of the Holy Maid of Kent, but as Fisher was taken seriously ill in December, proceedings against him were postponed for a time. In March, 1534, however, a special bill of attainder against the Bishop of Rochester and others for complicity in the matter of the Nun of Kent was introduced and passed. By this Fisher was condemned to forfeiture of all his personal estate and to be imprisoned during the king's pleasure. Subsequently a pardon was granted him on payment of a fine of 300 pounds.

    In the same session of Parliament was passed the Act of Succession, by which all who should be called upon to do so were compelled to take an oath of succession, acknowledging the issue of Henry and Anne as legitimate heirs to the throne, under pain of being guilty of misprision of treason. Fisher refused the oath and was sent to the Tower of London on April 26, 1534. Several efforts were made to induce him to submit, but without effect, and in November he was a second time attained of misprision of treason, his goods being forfeited as from the first of March preceding, and the See of Rochester being declared vacant retroactively to June 2. A long letter exists, written from the Tower by the bishop to Thomas Cromwell, which records the severity of his confinement and the sufferings he endured.

    In May of 1535, the new pope, Paul III, created Fisher Cardinal Priest of St. Vitalis, his motive being apparently to induce Henry by this mark of esteem to treat the bishop less severely. The effect was precisely the reverse. Henry forbade the cardinal's hat to be brought into England, declaring that he would send the head to Rome instead. In June a special commission for Fisher's trial was issued, and on June 17 he was arraigned in Westminster Hall on a charge of treason, in that he denied the king to be supreme head of the Church. Since he had been deprived of his bishopric by the Act of Attainder, he was treated as a commoner, and tried by jury. He was declared guilty, and condemned to be hanged, drawn, and quartered at Tyburn, but the mode of execution was changed, and instead he was beheaded on Tower Hill.

    The martyr's last moments were thoroughly in keeping with his previous life. He met death with a calm dignified courage which profoundly impressed all present. His headless body was stripped and left on the scaffold till evening, when it was thrown naked into a grave in the churchyard of Allhallows, Barking. Thence it was removed a fortnight later and laid beside that of Sir Thomas More in the church of St. Peter ad Vincula by the Tower. His head was stuck upon a pole on London Bridge, but its ruddy and lifelike appearance excited so much attention that, after a fortnight, it was thrown into the Thames, its place being taken by that of Sir Thomas More, whose martyrdom occurred on a few weeks later on July 6, 1535. The two martyrs are closely associated in history.

    Several portraits of Fisher exist, the best being by Holbein in the royal collection; and a few secondary relics are extant. In the Decree of December 29, 1886, when fifty-four of the English martyrs were beatified by Pope Leo XIII, the best place of all was given to St. John Fisher. After extensive research and approval in passing all obstacles placed by the Vatican-appointed devil's advocate, John was satisfactorily raised to sainthood in 1935 by Pope Pius XI. (Source: ibid, St. John Fisher)

    We want to thank the Friends of Our Lady of Fatima for expediting these resources of the Propers. Sources: Saint Andrew Daily Missal and the Marian Missal , 1945


Missa "Dóminus fortitúdo"

Go to the ORDINARY OF THE HOLY MASS THE MASS OF THE CATECHUMENS

INTROIT:   Psalm 27: 8-9
Dóminus fortitúdo plebis suæ, et protéctor salutárium Christi sui est: salvum fac pópulum tuum, et bénedic hæreditáti tuæ, et rege eos usque in sæculum. (Ps. 27: 1). Ad te, Dómine, clamábo Deus meus, ne síleas a me, nequando táceas a me, et assimilábor descendéntibus in lacum. v. Gloria Patri, et Filio, et Spiritui Sancto. Sicut erat in principio et nunc et semper et in saecula saeculorum. Amen.
Repeat Dóminus fortitúdo...
The Lord is the strength of His people, and the protector of the salvation of His anointed: save, O Lord, Thy people, and bless Thine inheritance, and rule them forever. (Ps. 27: 1) Unto thee will I cry, O Lord: O my God, be not Thou silent to me, lest if Thou be silent to me, I become like them that go down into the pit. v. Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Ghost, as it was in the beginning, is now and ever shall be, world without end. Amen.
Repeat The Lord is the strength...
Return to the ORDINARY OF THE HOLY MASS GLORIA
COLLECT
Dominus vobiscum. R. Et cum spiritu tuo.

Oremus. Deus virtútum, cujus est totum quod est óptimum: ínsere pectóribus nostris amórem tui nóminis,et præsta in nobis religiónis augmentum: ut quæ sunt bona, nútrias, ac pietátis stúdio, quæl sunt nutrita, custódias. Per Dóminum nostrum Jesum Christum Fílium tuum, qui tecum vivit et regnat in unitáte Spíritus Sancti, Deus,
Per omnia saecula saeculorum.
R. Amen.

Commemoration of St. Paulinus
Deus, qui ómnia pro te in hoc sæculo relinquéntibus, céntuplum in futúro et vitam ætérnam promisísti: ut sancti Pontíficis Paulíni vestígilis inhæréntes, valeámus terréna despícere, et sola coeléstia desideráre. Qui vivis et regnas, cum Deo Patre in unitáte Spíritu Sancti, Deus,
Per omnia saecula saeculorum.
R. Amen.

Collect for the Intercession of the Saints
Orémus. A cunctis nos quæsumus Dómine mentis et córporis defénde perículis: et intercedénte beáta et gloriósa semper Vírgine Dei Genitrice María, cum beáto Joseph, beátis Apóstolis tuis Petro et Paulo, et ómnibus Sanctis, salútem nobis tríbue benígnus et pacem; ut destrúctis adversitátibus et erróribus univérsis, Ecclésia tua secúra tibi sérviat libertáte. Per Dóminum nostrum Jesum Christum Fílium tuum, qui tecum vivit et regnat in unitáte Spíritus Sancti, Deus,
Per omnia saecula saeculorum.
R. Amen.

Collect for God's Holy Church
Orémus. Ecclésiæ tuæ, quæ-sumus, Dómine, preces placátus admítte: ut, destrúctis adversitát-ibus et erróribus univérsis, secura tibi sérviat libertáte. Per Dóminum nostrum Jesum Christum Fílium tuum, qui tecum vivit et regnat in unitáte Spíritus Sancti, Deus,
Per omnia saecula saeculorum.
R. Amen.
The Lord be with you. R. And with thy spirit.

Let us pray. O God, Who hast prepared for them that love Thee such good things as pass understanding: pour into our hearts such love towards Thee, that we, loving Thee in all things, and above all things, may obtain Thy promises which exceed all that we can desire. Through our Lord Jesus Christ, Thy Son, Who liveth and reigneth with Thee in the unity of the Holy Ghost, God,
Forever and ever.
R.Amen.

Commemoration of St. Paulinus
O God, Who hast promised to those who leave all in this world for Thee a hundred-fold in the world to come and life everlasting, mercifully grant that, following closely in the footsteps of the holy bishop, Paulinus, we may have the grace to despise earthly things and desire only Heavenly. Who livest and reignest, with God the Father, in the unity of the Holy Ghost, God,
Forever and ever.
R.Amen.

Collect for the Intercession of the Saints
Let us pray. Defend us, we beseech Thee, O Lord, from all dangers of mind and body: and through the intercession of the blessed and glorious Mary, ever Virgin, mother of God, of St Joseph, of Thy holy apostles, Peter and Paul, and of all the saints, in Thy loving-kindness grant us safety and peace; that, all adversities and errors being overcome, Thy Church may serve Thee in security and freedom. Through our Lord Jesus Christ, Thy Son, Who liveth and reigneth with Thee in the unity of the Holy Ghost, God,
Forever and ever.
R.Amen.

Collect for God's Holy Church
Let us pray. Graciously hear, O Lord, the prayers of Thy Church that, having overcome all adversity and every error, she may serve Thee in security and freedom. Through our Lord Jesus Christ, Thy Son, Who liveth and reigneth with Thee in the unity of the Holy Ghost, God,
Forever and ever.
R.Amen.

EPISTLE:   Romans 6: 3-11
Léctio Epístolæ beáti Pauli Apóstoli ad Romános. Fratres, Quicúmque baptizáti sumus in Christo Jesu, in morte ipsius baptizáti sumus. Consepúlti enim sumus cum illo per baptísmum in mortem: ut quómodo Christus surréxit a mórtuis per glóriam Patris, ita et nos in novitáte vitæ ambulémus. Si enim complantáti facti sumus similitúdini mortis ejus, simul et resurrectiónis érimus. Hoc sciéntes, quis vetus homo poster simul crucifíxus est, ut destruátur corpus peccáti, et ultra non serviámus peccáto. Si autem mórtui sumus cum Christo, crédimus quia simul étiam vivémus cum Christo: sciéntes quod Christus resúrgens ex mórtuis, jam non móritur, mors illi ultra non dóminabitur. Quod enim mórtuus est peccáto, mórtuus est semel: quod autem vivit, vivit Deo. Ita et vos existimáte, vos mórtuos quidem esse peccáto, vivéntes autem Deo in Christo Jesu Dómino nostro.
Deo Gratias.
Lesson from the Epistle of Blessed Paul the Apostle to the Romans. Brethren, All we who are baptized in Christ Jesus are baptized in His death. For we are buried together with Him by baptism unto death that as Christ is risen from the dead by the glory of the Father, so we also may walk in the newness of life. For if we have been planted together in the likeness of His death, we shall also be in the likeness of His resurrection. Knowing this, that our old man is crucified with Him, that the body of sin may be destroyed, and that we may serve sin no longer. For he that is dead is justified from sin. Now if we be dead with Christ, we believe that we shall live also together with Christ. Knowing that Christ, rising again from the dead, dieth now no more, death shall no more have dominion over Him. For in that He died to sin, He died once; but in that He liveth, He liveth unto God. So do you also reckon yourselves to be dead indeed to sin, but alive to God in Christ Jesus our Lord.
Thanks be to God.

GRADUAL:  Ps. 89: 13, 1
Convértere, Dómine, aliquanttuum, et deprecáre super servos tuos. V. Dómine, refúgium factus es nobis, a generatióne et progénie. Allelúja, allelúja. V. (Ps. 30: 2, 3) In Te, Dómine, sperávi, non confúndar in ætérnum: in justítia tua líbera me et erípe me: inclína ad me aurem tuam: accélera, ut eripías me. Allelúja.
Return, O Lord, a little: and be entreated in favor of Thy servants. V. Lord, Thou hast been our refuge from generation to generation. Alleluia, alleluia. V. (Ps. 30: 2,3) In Thee, O Lord, I have hoped, let me never be confounded: deliver me in Thy justice, and release me: bow down Thine ear to me, make haste to deliver me. Alleluia.

GOSPEL:    Mark 8: 1-9
Dominus vobiscum.
R. Et cum spiritu tuo.
Sequentia sancti Evangelii secundum Marcum.
R.Gloria tibi, Domine

In illo témpore: Dixit Jesus discípulis suis: Cum turba multa esset cum Jesu, nec habérernt quod manducárent, convocátis discípulis, alt illis: "Miséreor super turbam: quia ecce jam tríduo sústinent me, nec habent quod mandúcent: et si dimísero eos jejúnos in domum suam, deficíent in via: quidam enim ex eis de longe venérunt." Et respondérunt ei discípuli sui Unde illos quis potent hic saturáre pánibus in solitúdine? Et interrogávit eos: "Quot panes habétis?" Qui dixérunt: "Septem." Et præcépit turbæ discúmbere super terram. Et accípiens septem panes, grátias agens fregit, et dabat discápulis suis ut appónerent, et apposuérunt turbæ. Et habébant piscículos páucos: et ipsos benedíxit, et jussit appóni. Et manducavérunt, et saturáti sunt, et sustulérunt quod superáverat de fragméntis, septem sportas. Erant autem qui manducavérunt, quasi quátuor míllia et dimísit eos.
Laus tibi Christe.

The Lord be with you.
R. And with thy spirit.
The continuation of the holy Gospel according to Mark.R. Glory to Thee, O Lord

At that time, when there was a great multitude with Jesus, and they had nothing to eat, calling His disciples together, He saith to them: "I have compassion on the multitude, for behold they have now been with Me three days, and have nothing to eat and if I shall send them away fasting to their home, they will faint in the way: for some of them came from afar off." And His disciples answered Him: "From whence can any one fill them here with bread in the wilderness?" And he asked them: "How many loaves have ye?" Who said: "Seven." And He commanded the people to sit down on the ground. And taking the seven loaves, giving thanks, He broke and gave to His disciples to set before the people, And they had a few little fishes, and He blessed them, and commanded them to be set before' them. And they did eat, and were filled: and they took up that which was left of the fragments, seven baskets: and they that had eaten, were about four thousand: and He sent them away.
Praise be to Christ


Go to Father Louis Campbell's Sermon for the Sixth Sunday After Pentecost

Return to the ORDINARY OF THE HOLY MASS THE CREDO

OFFERTORY:    Psalm 16: 5-7
Dominus vobiscum.
R. Et cum spiritu tuo.

Pérfice gressus meos in sémitis tuis, ut non moveántur vestígia mea: inclína aurem tuam, et exáudi verba mea: mirífica misericórdias tuas, qui salvos facis sperántes in Te, Dómine.
The Lord be with you.
R. And with thy spirit.

Perfect Thou my goings in Thy paths, that my footsteps be not moved: incline Thine ear, and hear my words: show forth Thy wonderful mercies, Thou Who savest them that trust in Thee, O Lord
Return to the ORDINARY OF THE HOLY MASS THE OFFERTORY
SECRET
Propitiáre, Dómine, supplicatiónibus nostris: et has pópuli tui oblatiónes benígnus assúme: et ut nullíus sit írritum votum, nullíus vácua postulátio, præsta; ut quod fidéliter pétimus, efficáciter consequámur. Per Dóminum nostrum Jesum Christum, Filium Tuum, Qui Tecum vivit et regnat in unitate Spiritus Sancti, Deus,
Per omnia saecula saeculorum.
R. Amen.

Commemoration of St. Paulinus
Dona nobis, Dómine, perféctæ caritátis sacrifícium exémplo sancti Pontíficis Paulíni, cum altáris oblatióne conjúngere: et beneficiéntiæ stúdio sempitérnam misericórdiam promeréri. Per Dominum nostrum Jesum Christum Filium Tuum, Qui Tecum vivit et regnat in unitate Spiritus Sancti, Deus,
Per omnia saecula saeculorum.
R. Amen.

Secret for the Intercession of Saints
Exaudi nos Deus salutáris noster: ut per hujus sacraménti virtútem, a cunctis nos mentis et córporis hóstibus tueáris, grátiam tríbuens in præsénti, et glóriam in futuro. Per Dóminum nostrum Jesum Christum Fílium tuum, qui tecum vivit et regnat in unitáte Spíritus Sancti, Deus, Per omnia saecula saeculorum.
R. Amen.

Secret for God's Holy Church
Prótege nos, Dómine, tuis mystériis serviéntes: ut divínis rebus inhæréntes, et córpore tibi famulémur et mente. Per Dóminum nostrum Jesum Christum Fílium tuum, qui tecum vivit et regnat in unitáte Spíritus Sancti, Deus, Per omnia saecula saeculorum.
R. Amen.
Be appeased, O Lord, by our humble prayers, and favorably receive the offerings of Thy people: and that the prayers of none be vain, no one petition void, grant, that what we ask faithfully, we may obtain effectually. Through our Lord Jesus Christ, Thy Son, Who liveth and reigneth with Thee in the unity of the Holy Ghost, one God
Forever and ever.
R.Amen.

Commemoration of St. Paulinus
Grant us, O Lord, to join the sacrifice of perfect charity with the oblation of the altar, after the example of the holy bishop Paulinus, and, by zeal for good works, to deserve everlasting mercy. Through our Lord Jesus Christ Thy Son our Lord, Who liveth and reigneth with Thee in the unity of the Holy Ghost, one God
Forever and ever.
R.Amen.

Secret for the Intercession of the Saints
Graciously hear us, O God our Saviour, and, by virtue of this Sacrament, defend us from all enemies of soul and body, bestowing upon us Thy grace here and Thy glory hereafter. Through our Lord Jesus Christ, Thy Son, Who liveth and reigneth with Thee in the unity of the Holy Ghost, God, Forever and ever.
R.Amen.

Secret for God's Holy Church
Protect us, O Lord, who assist at Thy mysteries, that, cleaving to things divine, we may serve Thee both in body and in mind. Through our Lord Jesus Christ, Thy Son, Who liveth and reigneth with Thee in the unity of the Holy Ghost, God, Forever and ever.
R.Amen.

PREFACE   of the Most Holy Trinity
Dominus vobiscum.
R. Et cum spiritu tuo.
Sursum corda.
R.Habemus ad Dominum.
Gratias agamus Domino Deo nostro.
R. Dignum et justum est.

Vere dignum et justum est, aequum et salutare, nos tibi semper, et ubique gratias agere: Domine sancta, Pater omnipotens, aeterne Deus. Qui cum unigenito Filio: tuo et Spiritu Sancto, unus es Deus, unus es Dominus: non in uninus singularitate personae, sed in unius Trinitae substantiae. Quo denim de tua Gloria, revelante te, credimus, hoc de Filio tuo, hod de Spiritu Sancto, sine differentia discretionis sentimus. Ut in confessione verare, sempitiernaeque Deitatis, et in personis proprietas, et in essential unitas, et in majestate adoretur aequalitas. Quam laudant Angeli atque Archangeli, Cherubim, quoque ac Seraphim: qui non cessant clamare quotodie, una voce dicentes:
SANCTUS, SANCTUS, SANCTUS...
The Lord be with you.
R. And with thy spirit.
Lift up your hearts.
R.We have lifted them up to the Lord.
Let us give thanks to the Lord our God.
R. It is meet and just.

It is truly meet and just, right and for our salvation, that we should at all times and in all places, give thanks unto Thee, O holy Lord, Father almighty, ever-lasting God: Who, together with Thine only-begotten Son, and the Holy Ghost, are one God, one Lord: not in the oneness of a single Person, but in the Trinity of one substance. For what we believe by Thy revelation of Thy glory, the same do we believe of Thy Son, the same of the Holy Ghost, without difference or separation. So that in confessing the true and everlasting Godhead, distinction in persons, unity in essence, and equality in majesty may be adored. Which the Angels and Archangels, the Cherubim also and Seraphim do praise: who cease not daily to cry out with one voice saying:
HOLY, HOLY, HOLY...

Return to the ORDINARY OF THE HOLY MASS THE CANON OF THE MASS
COMMUNION:    Psalm 26: 6
Circuíbo, et immolábo in tabernáculo ejus hóstiam jubilatiónis: cantábo et psallum dicam Dómino.
Grant, O Lord, that we who have been filled with Thy gifts may be cleansed by their virtue and strengthened by their help.

POSTCOMMUNION
Dominus vobiscum.
R. Et cum spiritu tuo.
Oremus.
Repléti sumus, Dómine, munéribus tuis: tríbue, quæsumus; ut eórum et mundémur efféctu, et muniámur auxílio. Per Dóminum nostrum Jesum Christum Fílium tuum, qui tecum vivit et regnat in unitáte Spíritus Sancti, Deus,
Per omnia saecula saeculorum.
R. Amen.

Commemoration of St. Paulinus
Oremus. Tríbue nobis per hæc sancto, Dómine, illum pietátis et humilitátis afféctum, quem ex hoc divíno fonte hausit sanctus Póntifex tuus Paulínus: et ipsíus intercessióne, in omnes, qui te deprecántur, grátiæ tuæ divítias benígnus efffúnde. Per Dominum nostrum Jesum Christum, Filium Tuum, Qui Tecum vivit et regnat in unitate Spiritus Sancti, Deus,
Per omnia saecula saeculorum.
R. Amen.

Postcommunion for the Intercession of Saints
Orémus. Mundet et múniat nos quáesumus Dómine dívini sacraménti munus oblátum: et intercedénte beáta Vírgine Dei Genitríce María, cum beáto Joseph, beátis Apóstolis tuis Petro et Paulo, et ómnibus Sanctis; a cunctis nos reddat et pervérsitátibus expiátos, et advérsitátibus expedítos. Per eúmdem Dóminum nostrum Jesum Christum Fiiium tuum: Qui tecum vivit et regnat in unitate Spíritus Sancti, Deus.
Per omnia saecula saeculorum.
R. Amen.

Postcommunion for God's Holy Church
Orémus. Quæsumus, Dómine Deus noster, ut quos divína tribuis participatióne gaudére, humánis non sinas subjacére perículis. Per Dóminum nostrum Jesum Christum Fiiium tuum: Qui tecum vivit et regnat in unitate Spíritus Sancti, Deus.
Per omnia saecula saeculorum.
R. Amen.
The Lord be with you.
R. And with thy spirit.
Let us pray.
We have been filled, Lord, with Thy gifts: grant we beseech thee, that we may both be cleansed by their effects, and defended by their aid. Through the same Lord Jesus Christ, Thy Son, Who liveth and reigneth with Thee in the unity of the Holy Ghost, one God
For ever and ever.
R. Amen.

Commemoration of St. Paulinus
Let us pray. Grant us, O Lord, by these holy things that sentiment of piety and humility which Thy holy bishop Paulinus drew from the same divine source, and by his intercession benignly pour the riches of Thy grace upon all who call upon Thee. Through the Lord Jesus Christ, Thy Son, Who liveth and reigneth with Thee in the unity of the Holy Ghost, one God
For ever and ever.
R. Amen.

Postcommunion for the Intercession of the Saints
Let us pray. May the gift of this Divine Sacrament which we have offered, cleanse us and defend us, we beseech Thee, O Lord; and through the intercession of the Blessed Virgin Mary, mother of God, of St. Joseph, of Thy holy apostles Peter and Paul, and of all the saints, free us from all iniquity and deliver us from all adversity. Through the Lord Jesus Christ, Thy Son, Who liveth and reigneth with Thee in the unity of the Holy Ghost, one God
Forever and ever.
R. Amen.

Postcommunion for God's Holy Church
Let us pray. O Lord our God, we pray Thee that Thou suffer not to succumb to human hazards those whom Thou hast been pleased to make sharers of divine mysteries. Through the Lord Jesus Christ, Thy Son, Who liveth and reigneth with Thee in the unity of the Holy Ghost, one God
Forever and ever.
R. Amen.
Return to the ORDINARY OF THE HOLY MASS FOR THE FINAL BLESSING




Daily Proper of the Sixth Sunday After Pentecost