July 22, 2008
    SUNDAY
    vol 19, no. 188
Missa "Suscépimus, Deus"
Eighth Sunday After Pentecost
Give an account of thy stewardship


Semi-Double Observance of the Eighth Sunday After Pentecost


Missa "Suscépimus, Deus"

GREEN Vestments

Commemoration of the Octave Day of Saints Peter and Paul

       The theme of the Eighth Sunday is to account for your stewardship before God and then man. In the Epistle we are reminded of our divine filiation, and Our Lord tells us in a parable in today's Gospel of the duties thereby entailed. We are the children of God, since we may say in all truth: Our Father (Epistle). God has given us life, "wherefore we must life according to His will" (Collect).

        Just as this rich landowner who, before giving his son his share of the heritage, wishes to test his administrative capability, by entrusting to him things of little value, God, before making us His heirs in Heaven, has wished to test our fidelity by giving us the management on earth of both temporal and spiritual goods. But, like the steward mentioned by Jesus, we have been unfaithful, dissipating by sin the riches and talents which God entrusted to us.

        Therefore, vying in zeal with the children of the world, the sons of light imitate the foresight of the steward who, by means of his father's riches, prepared friends unto himself. Turning to profitable use what God has given to us, let us do good, and especially by almsgiving let us secure the testimony which the poor will bear their benefactors at the moment when all will have to give an account of their stewardship to the divine Judge.

       There is a commemoration today of the Octave Day of the Double of the First Class Feast of Saints Peter and Paul. For today's Proper below see Suscépimus, Deus


    Saint Thomas More, Martyr

        Though there is no commemoration, today is the historical traditional feast of Saint Thomas More. He was born on February 7, 1478 in London. In 1505, at the age of twenty-seven, More married his first wife, Jane Colt, ten years his junior. According to his son-in-law and first biographer William Roper, More wanted to marry Jane's second sister, but felt Jane would be humiliated if a younger sister married first. Their marriage was happy and bore four children; three daughters and a son — Margaret (Meg, his favorite), Elizabeth (Beth), Cicely (Cecy), and John (Jack); besides his children, More adopted an orphan girl, Margaret Giggs. As a very devoted father, he asked his children write to him when away, even if they had nothing particular to say, and did not beat them. Unusual for the era, he educated his daughters as he did his son, saying that women were just as intelligent as men, taking particular pride in eldest daughter Meg's achievements.

        Jane Colt died in 1511, and More remarried almost immediately, so his children would have a mother. His second wife, Alice Middleton, was a widow seven years his senior; they bore no children, although he adopted her daughter, Alice; of wife Alice, he said: "nec bella, nec puella" — neither a pearl, nor a girl. Erasmus cruelly described her nose as "the hooked beak of the harpy". Despite very different characters, More and Alice were affectionate, though he was unable to educate her as he had educated Jane and his daughters. In his epitaph, which he wrote himself, More praised Jane for bearing him four children, and Alice for being a loving stepmother. He declared that he could not tell whom he loved best, and expressed the hope that they would all be reunited in death.

        Despite his busy political career, he was a prolific scholar and literary man. His writing and scholarship earned him great reputation as a Christian Renaissance humanist in continental Europe, and his friend Erasmus of Rotterdam dedicated to him the masterpiece, In Praise of Folly; (the book's title puns More's name, "moria" is folly in Greek.) In his communications with other humanists, Erasmus described him as a model Man of Letters and as an omnium horarum homo. The humanistic project embraced by Erasmus and Thomas More sought re-examination and revitalization of Christian theology by studying the Bible and the writings of the Church Fathers in light of classical Greek literary and philosophic tradition. More and Erasmus collaborated on a Latin translation of the works of Lucian, published in Paris in 1506.

        From 1510 to 1518, Thomas More was one of the two undersheriffs of the city of London, a position of much responsibility, wherein he earned a reputation as an honest and effective public servant. In 1517 More entered the King's service as counselor and personal servant. Between 1513 and 1518, More worked on a History of King Richard III, an unfinished historiography, based on Sir Robert Honorr's Tragic Deunfall of Richard II, Suvereign of Britain (1485), that also greatly influenced William Shakespeare's play Richard III. Both More's and Shakespeare's works are controversial to contemporary historians for their unflattering portrait of King Richard III, a bias totally due to both authors' allegiance to the reigning Tudor dynasty that wrested the throne from Richard III with the Wars of the Roses. More's work, however, little mentions Henry VII, the first Tudor king, perhaps for having persecuted his father, Sir John More. Some historians see an attack on royal tyranny, rather than on Richard III, himself, or on the House of York.

        As way of note, this editor has done extensive research into Richard of Gloucester and he has been greatly maligned, not only because of Tudor propaganda bitterly passed down, but more importantly because Richard was, in truth, the last Catholic King of England. He sought to curb abuses that were creeping into a lukewarm hierarchy in England itself as well as Rome. One of the great offenders and shepherds in wolves' clothing was More's own tutor when Thomas was a mere youngster in Bishop John Morton's court. Morton was a cad who had a fetish for pedophilia long before anyone ever heard of the word. Richard was wise to Morton's cunning and appealed to Rome to no avail. Morton openly aligned with Henry Richmond (Henry VII) against Richard Plantagenet for political purposes and maligned the good name of a good man. This is fact! That is why More was badly tainted by the prejudice passed down by Morton and others to cover up the truth. Because Morton and many of the other bishops had deviated from the Faith in those years leading up to the laxity and lechery in Rome and the Protestant Revolution, their appointments had no authority as Pope Paul IV infallibly declared on February 15, 1559 in Cum Ex Apostolatus Officio. Thus, in light of that decree, the consecration of Henry VII would be null and void as well as all succeeding monarchs including his son Henry VIII and all who would follow up to today's current "queen" Elizabeth and her line. Historians will not admit this because of the repercussions on history and admittance that indeed the Roman Catholic Church, as appointed by Christ, has authority over all nations and sovereigns.

        As an English lawyer, author, and statesman he earned throughout his life a reputation as a leading humanist scholar, and occupied many public offices, including Lord Chancellor (1529–1532). Sir Thomas coined the word "utopia", a name he gave to an ideal, imaginary island nation whose political system he described in the eponymous book published in 1516. Utopia, a novel, was his most famous and controversial work, wherein a traveller, Raphael Hythloday (in Greek, his name and surname allude to the Archangel Raphael, purveyor of truth, and mean "speaker of nonsense"), describes the political arrangements of the imaginary island country of Utopia (Greek pun ou-topos [no place], eu-topos [good place]) to himself and to Peter Giles. This novel presents the city of Amaurote as "of them all this is the worthiest and of most dignity". Utopia is evidence that he greatly valued harmony and a strict hierarchy. All challenges to uniformity and hierarchy were perceived as dangers; practically, the greatest danger he saw was the challenge that heretics posed to the established faith. For Thomas More, the most important thing was maintaining the unity of Christendom; to his mind, the Lutheran Reformation's fragmentation and discord were dreadful.

        His personal counter-attack began in the manner expected from a writer. He assisted Henry VIII (read he wrote the whole thing) with writing the Defence of the Seven Sacraments (1521), a polemic response to Martin Luther's On the Babylonian Captivity of the Church. When Luther replied with Contra Henricum Regem Anglie (Against Henry, King of the English), More was tasked with writing a counter-response, Responsio ad Lutherum (Reply to Luther). This violent exchange had many intemperate personal insults; it deepened More's commitment to the order and discipline outlined in Utopia.

        Things began going sour and "utopia" took on a different light when Henry's base instincts began to take hold. Until then More had been fully devoted to Henry and to the cause of royal prerogative. He initially cooperated with the king's new policy, denouncing Cardinal Wolsey in Parliament and proclaiming the opinion of the theologians at Oxford and Cambridge that the marriage of Henry to Catherine of Aragon had been unlawful. But as Henry began to deny the authority of the Pope, More's qualms grew. For More, heresy was a disease, a threat to the peace and unity of both Church and society. His early actions against the Protestants included aiding Cardinal Wolsey in preventing Lutheran books from being imported into England. He also assisted in the production of a Star Chamber edict against heretical preaching. Many literary polemics appeared under his name. After becoming Lord Chancellor of England, More had six Lutherans burned at the stake and imprisoned many more. His chief concern in this matter was to wipe out collaborators of William Tyndale, the exiled Lutheran who in 1525 had published a Protestant translation of the Bible in English which was circulating clandestinely in England (Tyndale had also written The Practyse of Prelates (1530), opposing Henry VIII's divorce on the grounds that it was unscriptural and was a plot by Cardinal Wolsey to get Henry entangled in the papal courts).

        When Henry went too far in 1530, More refused to sign a letter by the leading English churchmen and aristocrats asking the Pope to annul Henry's marriage to Catherine. In 1531 he attempted to resign after being forced to take an oath declaring the king the Supreme Head of the English Church "as far as the law of Christ allows." In 1532 he asked the king again to relieve him of his office, claiming that he was ill and suffering from sharp chest pains. This time Henry granted his request.

        The last straw for Henry came in 1533, when More refused to attend the coronation of Anne Boleyn as the Queen of England. Technically, this was not an act of treason as More had written to Henry acknowledging Anne's queenship and expressing his desire for his happiness[5]—but his friendship with the old queen, Catherine of Aragon, still prevented him from attending Anne's triumph. His refusal to attend her coronation was widely interpreted as a snub against the marriage wrecker Boleyn, who prompted Henry to punish More.

        Shortly thereafter More was charged with accepting bribes, but the patently false charges had to be dismissed for lack of any evidence. In 1534 he was accused of conspiring with Elizabeth Barton, a nun who had prophesied against the king's divorce, but More was able to produce a letter in which he had instructed Barton not to interfere with state matters. On April 13 of that same year More was asked to appear before a commission and swear his allegiance to the parliamentary Act of Succession. More accepted Parliament's right to declare Anne the legitimate queen of England, but he refused to take the oath because of an anti-papal preface to the Act asserting Parliament's authority to legislate in matters of religion by denying the authority of the Pope, which More would not accept. On July 1, 1534 Sir Thomas More was tried before a panel of judges that included the new Lord Chancellor, Sir Thomas Audley, as well as Anne Boleyn's father, brother, and uncle. He was charged with high treason for denying the validity of the Act of Succession.

        More believed he could not be convicted as long as he did not explicitly deny that the king was the head of the church, and he therefore refused to answer all questions regarding his opinions on the subject. Thomas Cromwell, at the time the most powerful of the king's advisors, brought forth the Solicitor General, Richard Rich, to testify that More had, in his presence, denied that the king was the legitimate head of the church. This testimony was almost certainly perjured (witnesses Richard Southwell and Mr. Palmer both denied having heard the details of the reported conversation), but on the strength of it the jury voted for More's conviction. More was tried, and found guilty, under a newly concocted Treason Act of 1534.

        Before his sentencing, More spoke freely of his belief that "no temporal man may be the head of the spirituality". He was sentenced to be hanged, drawn, and quartered (the usual punishment for traitors) but the king commuted this to execution by beheading. The execution took place on July 6, 1534. When he came to mount the steps to the scaffold, he is widely quoted as saying (to the officials): "See me safe up: for my coming down, I can shift for myself"; while on the scaffold he declared that he died "the king's good servant, but God's first." More's body was buried at the Tower of London, in the chapel of St Peter ad Vincula. His head was placed over London Bridge for a month after which it was rescued by his daughter, Margaret Roper, before it could be thrown in the River Thames. The skull is believed to rest in the Roper Vault of St. Dunstan's at Canterbury.

        More was beatified by Pope Leo XIII in 1886 and canonized four hundred years after his death by Pope Pius XI in 1935 along with Bishop John Fisher after a mass petition of English Catholics to honor these two stalwarts who were the only two who would not abandon Eternal Rome. His Holiness Pius XI declared him a 'patron saint of politics' in protest against the rise of secular, anti-religious Communism raising its ugly head in the mushrooming 20th century. The Oscar-winning film A Man for All Seasons in the mid sixties before Vatican II ever got a firm foothold still stands as a stirring tribute to St. Thomas More, played so adroitly by Paul Scofield Sources: Catholic Enyclopedia, 1913 and The Life of Sir Thomas More.

      We want to thank the Friends of Our Lady of Fatima for expediting these resources of the Propers. Sources: Saint Andrew Daily Missal and the Marian Missal , 1945

Go to the ORDINARY OF THE HOLY MASS THE MASS OF THE CATECHUMENS
INTROIT:   Psalm 47: 10-11
Suscépimus, Deus, misericórdiam tuam in médio templi tui secúndum nomen tuum, ita et laus tua in fines terrae: justitia plena est déxtera Tua. (Ps. 47: 2) Magnus Dóminus, et laudabilia nimis: in civitate Dei nostri, in monte sancto ejus. v. Gloria Patri, et Filio, et Spiritui Sancto. Sicut erat in principio et nunc et semper et in saecula saeculorum. Amen.
Repeat Suscépimus, Deus...
We have received, 0 God, Thy Mercy in the midst of Thy temple to Thy Name, O God, so also is Thy praise unto the according ends of the earth Thy right hand is full of justice. (Ps. 47: 2) Great is the Lond, and exceedingly to be pra/meÓ, in the city of God, in His holy mountain. v. Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Ghost, as it was in the beginning, is now and ever shall be, world without end. Amen.
Repeat We have received, O God...
Return to the ORDINARY OF THE HOLY MASS THE MASS OF THE CATECHUMENS
COLLECT
Dominus vobiscum. R. Et cum spiritu tuo.

Oremus. Largire nobis, quessumus Dómíne, semper spiritum cogiténdi quae recta sunt, propitius et agéndi ut, qui sine te esse non póssumus, secúndum te vivere valeamus. Per Dóminum nostrum Jesum Christum Fílium tuum, qui tecum vivit et regnat in unitáte Spíritus Sancti, Deus,
Per omnia saecula saeculorum.
R. Amen.

Second Collect of the Octave Day of Sts. Peter and Paul
Orémus. Deus, qui hodiérnam diem Apolstolórum tuórum Petri et Pauli martyrio consecrásti: da Ecclésiae tuae, eórum in ómnibus sequi praecéptum; per quos religiónis sumpsit exórdium. Per Dóminum nostrum Jesum Christum Fílium tuum, qui tecum vivit et regnat in unitáte Spíritus Sancti, Deus, Per Dóminum nostrum Jesum Christum Fílium tuum, qui tecum vivit et regnat in unitáte Spíritus Sancti, Deus,
Per omnia saecula saeculorum.
R. Amen.

Collect for the Intercession of the Saints
Orémus. A cunctis nos quæsumus Dómine mentis et córporis defénde perículis: et intercedénte beáta et gloriósa semper Vírgine Dei Genitrice María, cum beáto Joseph, beátis Apóstolis tuis Petro et Paulo, et ómnibus Sanctis, salútem nobis tríbue benígnus et pacem; ut destrúctis adversitátibus et erróribus univérsis, Ecclésia tua secúra tibi sérviat libertáte. Per Dóminum nostrum Jesum Christum Fílium tuum, qui tecum vivit et regnat in unitáte Spíritus Sancti, Deus,
Per omnia saecula saeculorum.
R. Amen.

Collect for God's Holy Church
Orémus. Ecclésiæ tuæ, quæsumus, Dómine, preces placátus admítte: ut, destrúctis adversitát-ibus et erróribus univérsis, secura tibi sérviat libertáte. Per Dóminum nostrum Jesum Christum Fílium tuum, qui tecum vivit et regnat in unitáte Spíritus Sancti, Deus,
Per omnia saecula saeculorum.
R. Amen.
The Lord be with you. R. And with thy spirit.

Let us pray. Be Thou, O Lord, the sanctifier, and the guardian of Thy people, so that, being defended by the protection of Thine apostle James, they may both please Thee by their conduct and serve Thee with mind all untroubled. Through our Lord Jesus Christ, Thy Son, Who liveth and reigneth with Thee in the unity of the Holy Ghost, God,
Forever and ever.
R.Amen.

Second Collect of the Octave Day of Sts. Peter and Paul
Let us pray. God, Who hast consecrated this day to the martyrdom of Thine apostles Peter and Paul, grant to Thy Church in all things to follow their teaching from whom it received the right ordering of religion in the beginning. Through our Lord Jesus Christ, Thy Son, Who liveth and reigneth with Thee in the unity of the Holy Ghost, God,
Forever and ever.
R.Amen.

Collect for the Intercession of the Saints
Let us pray. Defend us, we beseech Thee, O Lord, from all dangers of mind and body: and through the intercession of the blessed and glorious Mary, ever Virgin, mother of God, of St Joseph, of Thy holy apostles, Peter and Paul, and of all the saints, in Thy loving-kindness grant us safety and peace; that, all adversities and errors being overcome, Thy Church may serve Thee in security and freedom. Through our Lord Jesus Christ, Thy Son, Who liveth and reigneth with Thee in the unity of the Holy Ghost, God,
Forever and ever.
R.Amen.

Collect for God's Holy Church
Let us pray. Graciously hear, O Lord, the prayers of Thy Church that, having overcome all adversity and every error, she may serve Thee in security and freedom. Through our Lord Jesus Christ, Thy Son, Who liveth and reigneth with Thee in the unity of the Holy Ghost, God,
Forever and ever.
R.Amen.

EPISTLE:   Romans 8: 12-17
Léctio Epístolæ beáti Pauli Apóstolii ad Romanos. Fratres, Debit6res sumus non carni, ut secúndum carnem vivémus, Si enim secúndum carnem vixéritis, moriémini: si autem spiritu fatta carnis cavéritis, vivétis. Quicúmque enim spfrítu Dei agúntur, ii sunt filii Dei. Non enim accepístís spfritum servitútís iterum in timbre adoptíonis sed acceptíìstis spíritum adoptiónis fílìorum, in quo clamémus: Abba (Pater). Ipse enim Spiritus testimónium reddit spiritui nostro, quod sumus fffli Dei. Si autem Filii, et herédes: heredes quidem Dei, coherédes autem Christi.
Deo Gratias.
Lesson from the Epistle of Blessed Paul the Apostle to the Romans, We are debtors, not to the flesh, to live according to the flesh; for if you live according to the flesh, you shall die but if by the Spirit you mortify the deeds of the flesh, you shall live. For whoever are led by the Spirit of God, they are the sons of God. For you have not received the spirit of bondage again in fear, but you have received the spirit of adoption of sons, whereby we cry, Abba (Father). For the Spirit Himself giveth testimony to our spirit, that we are the sons of God and if sons, heirs also heirs indeed of God, and joint heirs with Christ.
Thanks be to God.

GRADUAL:  Psalm 30: 3
Esto mihi in Deum protectórem, et in locum refúgii, ut salvum me facias. V. (Ps. 70: 1) Dómíne, in te speravi: Dómine, non confúndar in aetérnum. Allelúja, allelúja. V. (Ps. 47: 2) Magnus Dóminus, et laudbilis valde, in cìvitate Dei nostri, in monte sancto ejus. Allelúja.
Be Thou unto me a God, a protector, and a place of refuge, to save me. V. (Ps. 70: 1) In Thee. 0 God, have I hoped: [) Lord, let me never be confounded. Alleluia, alleluia. V. (Ps. 47: 2) Great is the Lord, and exceedingly to be praised, in the city of our God in His holy mountain. Alleluia.

GOSPEL:    Luke 16: 1-9
Dominus vobiscum.
R. Et cum spiritu tuo.
Sequentia sancti Evangelii secundum Lucam.
R.Gloria tibi, Domine

In illo témpore: Dixit Jesus discipulis sui pardbolam hanc: "Homo quidam erat dives, qui habébat villicum: et hic diffamatus est apud illum quasi dissipasset bona ipsius. Et vocavit illum, et ait î11i: Quid hoc audio de te? Redde rationem villicatiónis tuae: jam enim non póteris villicare. Ait autem villicus intra se: Quid faciam, quia Dominus meus aufert a me villicatiónem? Fodere non valeo, mendicare erubésco. Scio quid faciam, ut, cum amotus fuero a villicatione, recipiant me in domos sues. Convocatis itaque singulis debitoribus domina sui, dicébat primo: Quantum debes domino me? At ille dixit: Centum cados olei. Dixitque illi: Accipe cautionem tuam: et sede cito, scribe quiquaginta. Deinde alii dixit: Tu vero quantum debes? Qui ait: Centum coros tritici. Ait illi: Accipe litteras tuas, et scribe octoginta. Et laudavit d6minus villicum iniquitatis, quia prudénter fecisset: quia filii hujus saeculi prudentiores filiis lucis in generati6ne sua sunt. Et ego vobis dico: facite vobis amicos de mammona iniquitatis: ut, com defecéritis, recipiant vos in aeterna tabernacula."
Laus tibi Christe.

The Lord be with you.
R. And with thy spirit.
The continuation of the holy Gospel according to Matthew.
R. Glory to Thee, O Lord

At that time Jesus said to His disciples this parable: "There was a certain man, who had a steward and the same was accused unto him that he had wasted his goods; and he called him, and said to him: How is it that I hear this of thee? Give an account of thy stewardship, for now thou canst be steward no longer, And the steward said within himself: What shall I do, because my lord taketh away from me the stewardship? To dig I am not able: to beg I am ashamed. I know what I will do, that when I shall be put out of the stewardship, they may receive me into their houses, Therefore calling together every one of his lord's debtors, he said to the first: How much dost thou owe my lord? But he said: A hundred barrels of oil. And he said to him: Take thy bill, and sit down quickly, and write fifty. Then he said to another: And how much dost thou owe my lord? Who said: A hundred quarters of wheat. He said to him: Take thy bill, and write eighty. And the lord commended the unjust steward, as much as he had done wisely: for the children of this world are wiser in their generation than the children of light. And I say to you: Make unto you friends of the mammon of iniquity, that when you shall fail, they may receive you into everlasting dwellings."
Praise be to Christ


Go to Father Louis Campbell's Sermon for the Eighth Sunday After Pentecost

Return to the ORDINARY OF THE HOLY MASS THE CREDO

OFFERTORY:    Psalm 17: 28, 32
Dominus vobiscum.
R. Et cum spiritu tuo.

Pópulum húmilemì salvum facìes Dómine, et óculos superbórum humiliabis: quoniam quis Deus praeter te. Dómine?
The Lord be with you.
R. And with thy spirit.

Thou wilt save the humble O Lord, And wilt bring down the eyes of the proud: for who is God but Thee, O Lord?
Return to the ORDINARY OF THE HOLY MASS THE OFFERTORY
SECRET
Súscipe, quaesumus Dómine, múunera quae tibi de tua Iargitéte deférimus: ut haec sacroséncta mystéria, grétiae tuae operénte virtúte, et praeséntis vitae nos conversatióne sanctificent, at ad géudia sempitérna perdúcant. Per Dóminum nostrum Jesum Christum, Filium Tuum, Qui Tecum vivit et regnat in unitate Spiritus Sancti, Deus,
Per omnia saecula saeculorum.
R. Amen.

Second Secret for the Commemoration of the Octave Day of Sts. Peter and Paul
Hostias, Dómine, quas, nómini tuo sacrándas offérimus, apostólica prosequátur orátio: per quam nos expiári tríbuas, et deféndi. Per Dominum nostrum Jesum Christum Filium Tuum, Qui Tecum vivit et regnat in unitate Spiritus Sancti, Deus,
Per omnia saecula saeculorum.
R. Amen.

Secret for the Intercession of Saints
Exaudi nos Deus salutáris noster: ut per hujus sacraménti virtútem, a cunctis nos mentis et córporis hóstibus tueáris, grátiam tríbuens in præsénti, et glóriam in futuro. Per Dóminum nostrum Jesum Christum Fílium tuum, qui tecum vivit et regnat in unitáte Spíritus Sancti, Deus, Per omnia saecula saeculorum.
R. Amen.

Secret for God's Holy Church
Prótege nos, Dómine, tuis mystériis serviéntes: ut divínis rebus inhæréntes, et córpore tibi famulémur et mente. Per Dóminum nostrum Jesum Christum Fílium tuum, qui tecum vivit et regnat in unitáte Spíritus Sancti, Deus, Per omnia saecula saeculorum.
R. Amen.
Accept, we beseech Thee, 0 Lord, the gifts of Thine own bounty, which we bring Thee: that these holy and sacred Mysteries, by the working of the power of Thy grace, may sanctify us in our conduct of" this present life and bring us to everlasting joys. Through our Lord Jesus Christ, Thy Son, Who liveth and reigneth with Thee in the unity of the Holy Ghost, one God
Forever and ever.
R.Amen.

Second Secret of the Octave Day of Sts. Peter and Paul May the prayer of Thine apostles, O Lord, accompany the sacrifices which we offer to be consecrated to Thy name, and through it do Thou grant us to be pardoned and defended. Through our Lord Jesus Christ Thy Son our Lord, Who liveth and reigneth with Thee in the unity of the Holy Ghost, one God
Forever and ever.
R.Amen.

Secret for the Intercession of the Saints
Graciously hear us, O God our Saviour, and, by virtue of this Sacrament, defend us from all enemies of soul and body, bestowing upon us Thy grace here and Thy glory hereafter. Through our Lord Jesus Christ, Thy Son, Who liveth and reigneth with Thee in the unity of the Holy Ghost, God, Forever and ever.
R.Amen.

Secret for God's Holy Church
Protect us, O Lord, who assist at Thy mysteries, that, cleaving to things divine, we may serve Thee both in body and in mind. Through our Lord Jesus Christ, Thy Son, Who liveth and reigneth with Thee in the unity of the Holy Ghost, God, Forever and ever.
R.Amen.

PREFACE   of the Most Holy Trinity
Dominus vobiscum.
R. Et cum spiritu tuo.
Sursum corda.
R.Habemus ad Dominum.
Gratias agamus Domino Deo nostro.
R. Dignum et justum est.

Vere dignum et justum est, aequum et salutare, nos tibi semper, et ubique gratias agere: Domine sancta, Pater omnipotens, aeterne Deus. Qui cum unigenito Filio: tuo et Spiritu Sancto, unus es Deus, unus es Dominus: non in uninus singularitate personae, sed in unius Trinitae substantiae. Quo denim de tua Gloria, revelante te, credimus, hoc de Filio tuo, hod de Spiritu Sancto, sine differentia discretionis sentimus. Ut in confessione verare, sempitiernaeque Deitatis, et in personis proprietas, et in essential unitas, et in majestate adoretur aequalitas. Quam laudant Angeli atque Archangeli, Cherubim, quoque ac Seraphim: qui non cessant clamare quotodie, una voce dicentes:
SANCTUS, SANCTUS, SANCTUS...
The Lord be with you.
R. And with thy spirit.
Lift up your hearts.
R.We have lifted them up to the Lord.
Let us give thanks to the Lord our God.
R. It is meet and just.

It is truly meet and just, right and for our salvation, that we should at all times and in all places, give thanks unto Thee, O holy Lord, Father almighty, ever-lasting God: Who, together with Thine only-begotten Son, and the Holy Ghost, are one God, one Lord: not in the oneness of a single Person, but in the Trinity of one substance. For what we believe by Thy revelation of Thy glory, the same do we believe of Thy Son, the same of the Holy Ghost, without difference or separation. So that in confessing the true and everlasting Godhead, distinction in persons, unity in essence, and equality in majesty may be adored. Which the Angels and Archangels, the Cherubim also and Seraphim do praise: who cease not daily to cry out with one voice saying:
HOLY, HOLY, HOLY...

Return to the ORDINARY OF THE HOLY MASS THE CANON OF THE MASS
COMMUNION:    Psalm 33: 9
Gustate, et vidéte, quóníam suavis est Dóminus. beatus vir, qui sperat in eo.
Taste and see that the Lord is sweet: blessed is the man that hopeth in Him.

POSTCOMMUNION
Dominus vobiscum.
R. Et cum spiritu tuo.
Oremus.
Sit, nobis, Dómine, reparatio mentis et córporis Caeléste mystérium: ut cujus exséquimur cultura, sentiamus efféctum. Per Dóminum nostrum Jesum Christum Fílium tuum, qui tecum vivit et regnat in unitáte Spíritus Sancti, Deus,
Per omnia saecula saeculorum.
R. Amen.

Second Postcommunion of the Octave Day of Sts. Peter and Paul
Orémus. Quos coelésti, Dómine, aliménto satiásti: apostólicis intercessiónibus ab omni adversitáte custódi. Per Dominum nostrum Jesum Christum, Filium Tuum, Qui Tecum vivit et regnat in unitate Spiritus Sancti, Deus,
Per omnia saecula saeculorum.
R. Amen.

Postcommunion for the Intercession of Saints
Orémus. Mundet et múniat nos quáesumus Dómine dívini sacraménti munus oblátum: et intercedénte beáta Vírgine Dei Genitríce María, cum beáto Joseph, beátis Apóstolis tuis Petro et Paulo, et ómnibus Sanctis; a cunctis nos reddat et pervérsitátibus expiátos, et advérsitátibus expedítos. Per eúmdem Dóminum nostrum Jesum Christum Fiiium tuum: Qui tecum vivit et regnat in unitate Spíritus Sancti, Deus.
Per omnia saecula saeculorum.
R. Amen.

Postcommunion for God's Holy Church
Orémus. Quæsumus, Dómine Deus noster, ut quos divína tribuis participatióne gaudére, humánis non sinas subjacére perículis. Per Dóminum nostrum Jesum Christum Fiiium tuum: Qui tecum vivit et regnat in unitate Spíritus Sancti, Deus.
Per omnia saecula saeculorum.
R. Amen.
The Lord be with you.
R. And with thy spirit.
Let us pray.
May this Heavenly Mystery be to us, O Lord, for renewal of mind and body: that we may enjoy the fruits of that which we celebrate. Through the same Lord Jesus Christ, Thy Son, Who liveth and reigneth with Thee in the unity of the Holy Ghost, one God
For ever and ever.
R. Amen.

Second Postcommunion of the Octave Day of Sts. Peter and Paul
Preserve, O Lord from all dangers, by the intercession of Thine apostles, those whom Thou hast filled with heavenly nourishment. Through the Lord Jesus Christ, Thy Son, Who liveth and reigneth with Thee in the unity of the Holy Ghost, one God
For ever and ever.
R. Amen.

Postcommunion for the Intercession of the Saints
Let us pray. May the gift of this Divine Sacrament which we have offered, cleanse us and defend us, we beseech Thee, O Lord; and through the intercession of the Blessed Virgin Mary, mother of God, of St. Joseph, of Thy holy apostles Peter and Paul, and of all the saints, free us from all iniquity and deliver us from all adversity. Through the Lord Jesus Christ, Thy Son, Who liveth and reigneth with Thee in the unity of the Holy Ghost, one God
Forever and ever.
R. Amen.

Postcommunion for God's Holy Church
Let us pray. O Lord our God, we pray Thee that Thou suffer not to succumb to human hazards those whom Thou hast been pleased to make sharers of divine mysteries. Through the Lord Jesus Christ, Thy Son, Who liveth and reigneth with Thee in the unity of the Holy Ghost, one God
Forever and ever.
R. Amen.
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Daily Proper of the Eighth Sunday After Pentecost