SUNDAY
April 2, 2006
vol. 17, no. 79

The Living and the Dead


Over the years the enemy has done all in his power to sabotage those who have the power to confect through rightful, proper and authentic succession of the Apostles. God's chief adversary decimated the ranks with the Arian heresy, the rise of Islam, and the Protestant Revolution; but none have been as devastating as the situation in the Church today where only those ordained or consecrated bishops before 1968 have the power or authority to perpetuate the continual Sacrifice, and those who have that authority have thrown it away by embracing the Novus Ordo. Today the perfect Sacrifice of the Mass has been gutted of the propitiatory sacrifice of the spotless Lamb and Victim; and replaced with a participatory offering that is defiled before God, and most unpleasing to Him. It is dead to Him.

      "What we are left with is horrible to contemplate. In Catholic churches all over the world we have the spectacle of empty rituals with no more power to save than the dead and useless rites of the Old Law. Those Catholics who are in good faith and whose hearts are right before God may still live in God's grace, but not because of these empty rites. It has to be extremely difficult to maintain one's faith under such conditions since, according to the principle, "Lex orandi, lex credendi," one's manner of worship determines the quality and shape of one's faith. Perhaps you have relatives or friends who are struggling to keep the faith, or whose faith has been lost or severely damaged by participation in the new rites. May God bring them back to the true faith."

    Editor's Note: In Father Louis Campbell's sermon for Passion Sunday, he concentrates on today's Epistle of St. Paul to the Hebrews in which the Apostle affirms that all good works are fruitless without the proper offering of the Spotless Victim in the continual sacrifice. No burnt offering or animal sacrifices will appease God; it is only by blood, the Blood of the Immolated Lamb of God, that man can be redeemed. Only through Jesus Christ can man attain eternal salvation, not through Buddha, Mohammed, Hare Krishna or Wicca, not through just saying "Lord, I am saved" but by faith and works. These are carried out only in the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass, infallibly perpetuated by the Apostles and set in stone for all time by the infallible decree Quo Primum by Pope St. Pius V "in perpetuity." The Holy Sacrifice of the Mass stands apart as the only worthy sacrifice - a living memorial to God, whereas all other offerings are dead to God as St. Paul reasserts in today's Epistle. The dead works of the Old Law replicate the dead works of today's Novus Ordo and so many are deprived of grace and the sacraments because they do not have the true sacrifice, but rather the "abomination of desolation" foretold by Christ in Matthew 24: 15 in which Father further provides notes from the Haydock Commentary of the Douay-Rheims Bible, which confirms the new mass as such. Father laments how many parishes around the world are void of the True Sacrifice, void of valid priests, and void of true Successors of the Apostles, yay, even void of a true Successor of Peter. Father lays out the bitter truth in his sermon. [bold and italics below are editor's emphasis.]


    Jesus Christ offered Himself to the Father on Calvary as a pure and holy Victim to take away the sins of the world. Through the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass, His offering is made present in every age, so that all who believe may be cleansed of their sins and prepared for eternal life. Noting the insufficiency of the animal sacrifices of the Old Law, St. Paul says, "How much more will the blood of Christ, who through the Holy Spirit offered himself unblemished unto God, cleanse your conscience from dead works to serve the living God?" (Hebrews 9:14).

    The "dead works" were those of the Old Law, which did not have the power in itself to cleanse from sin or give grace. St. Paul comments: "For if a law had been given that could give life, justice would truly be from the Law. But the Scripture shut up all things under sin, that by the faith of Jesus Christ the promise might be given to those who believe" (Galatians 3: 21b,22).

    All sins, of course, are dead works. But even good works performed in the natural order are "dead works" insofar as they are not meritorious on the supernatural level. Human nature, since the Fall, does not have within itself the power to please God. Most Catholics these days think their good works are deserving of an eternal reward, since we are now assured that we are all going to Heaven. Vatican scholars are even trying to rehabilitate Judas Iscariot (www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,13509-1981591_1,00.html). But only when the bond of friendship with God is restored through faith in Jesus Christ, the Mediator of the New Covenant, do man's works become meritorious and pleasing to God, for "without faith it is impossible to please God" (Hebrews 11:6). St. Paul speaks of the separation of the true believers from those who remained observers of the Old Law:

    "We have an altar, from which they have no right to eat who serve the tabernacle. For the bodies of those animals whose blood is brought into the Holies by the high priest for sin, are burned outside the camp; and so Jesus also, that He might sanctify the people by His blood, suffered outside the gate. Let us therefore go forth to Him outside the camp, bearing His reproach; for here we have no permanent city, but we seek for the city that is to come" (Hebrews 13: 10-14).

    For nearly two millennia the Catholic Church has worshipped God by offering the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass "outside the camp," leaving behind those who continued to observe the "dead works" of the Old Law. But as we read in the notes on the "abomination of desolation" in the original Douay-Rheims Bible (www.realdouayrheims.com), it was not always to be so:

    "This abomination of desolation foretold, was first partly fulfilled in diverse profanations of the Temple of Jerusalem, when the sacrifice and service of God was taken away. But specially it shall be fulfilled by Antichrist and his Precursors, when they shall abolish the holy Mass, which is the Sacrifice of Christ's body and blood, and the only sovereign worship due to God in his Church: as St. Hippolytus writeth in these words: The Churches shall lament with great lamentation, because there shall neither oblation be made, nor incense, nor worship grateful to God. But the sacred houses of Churches shall be like to cottages, and the precious body and blood of Christ shall not be extant (openly in Churches) in those days, the Liturgy (or Mass) shall be extinguished, the Psalmody shall cease, the reciting of the Scriptures shall not be heard. Hippol. de Antichristo. By which it is plain that the Heretics of these days be the special fore-runners of Antichrist."

    In the time of St. Augustine there were some 800 bishops in Africa. Then along came Mohammed and the religion of Islam, with the result that the African bishops were reduced in a short time to five (biblia.com/jesusbible/daniel2.htm). Martin Luther and Protestantism ensured that many millions would be deprived of priesthood, sacrifice, and sacraments for hundreds of years, and the forerunners of the Antichrist in our time have done their best to deprive the rest of us of the same.

    It has been said that the liturgical heritage of the Roman Rite may well be the most precious treasure of our entire Western civilization. But they have destroyed the sacred rites of the Mass and the Sacraments by changing the form required for the validity of these rites, for example, the changes to the words of consecration in the Mass, especially the substitution of the words "for all" in place of "for many," ("pro multis") and the removal of the words "mysterium fidei", the "mystery of faith". These things were done in the wake of Vatican II by the group Consilium, established by Paul VI to initiate the reform of the Mass and the Sacraments, the secretary and prime mover of which was Archbishop Annibale Bugnini, an alleged Freemason.

    Recent studies of the new rites of the ordination of priests and the ordination (consecration) of bishops make a convincing case for their invalidity, since the form required for validity in each case, which had been clearly identified by Pope Pius XII in his Apostolic Constitution Sacramentum Ordinis, (Nov. 30, 1947), has been substantially altered. We are forced to the conclusion that those who are ordained or consecrated bishops in the New Rite of Ordination are no bishops at all. Virtually all of those who hold high office in the Church today have been ordained in the New Rite. This includes Benedict XVI, who is thus not even a bishop, let alone pope. And it makes little difference if the rite of ordination of priests is valid or not if there are no true bishops to ordain them, just as it makes little difference if the essential words of the Consecration and the essential forms of the Sacraments are valid or not if there are no true priests to confect them.

    What we are left with is horrible to contemplate. In Catholic churches all over the world we have the spectacle of empty rituals with no more power to save than the dead and useless rites of the Old Law. Those Catholics who are in good faith and whose hearts are right before God may still live in God's grace, but not because of these empty rites. It has to be extremely difficult to maintain one's faith under such conditions since, according to the principle, "Lex orandi, lex credendi," one's manner of worship determines the quality and shape of one's faith. Perhaps you have relatives or friends who are struggling to keep the faith, or whose faith has been lost or severely damaged by participation in the new rites. May God bring them back to the true faith.

    In these difficult times we draw near to Christ our Savior and Lord: "Having therefore a great High Priest who has passed into the heavens, Jesus the Son of God, let us hold fast our confession. For we have not a high priest who cannot have compassion on our infirmities, but one tried as we are in all things except sin. Let us therefore draw near with confidence to the throne of grace, that we may obtain mercy and find grace to help in time of need" (Hebrews 4:14-16).

Father Louis J. Campbell


    SUNDAY
    April 2, 2006
    vol 17, no. 79
    "Qui legit, intelligat"
    Father Louis Campbell's Sunday Sermons