Making Sense of Sensus Catholicus (jan4ssc.htm)

Tuesday
January 4, 2005
vol 16, no. 4

The Perfect Union



      The Triune Divinity wrote the perfect script - a paradox to even "His Own who knew Him not...and received Him not" (John 1: 10) - for what better vocabulary could ever suffice than the Incarnate Word. That Incarnate Word was embodied with a Divine nature which was infinite and a human nature which was finite in all things except sin.
by
Father James F. Wathen

        "Mary communed with the Child in her womb, not as ordinary mothers experience the growth and infantile movements, of their babies, which are ill-defined. Mary worshipped the Child of Her womb as Her God, and, was aware that He received her adoration, her joyful thanksgiving, and Her immeasurable and most worthy love. Their Hearts were welded during those days and they shall never be sundered."

    In John 21:20-24 we read:

    "Peter turning about, saw that disciple whom Jesus loved following, who also leaned on his breast at supper and said: Lord, who is he that shall betray thee? Him therefore when Peter had seen, he saith to Jesus: Lord, and what shall this man do? Jesus saith to him: 'So I will have him to remain till I come, what is it to thee? Follow thou Me.' This saying therefore went abroad among the brethren, that that disciple should not die. And Jesus did not say to him: He should not die; but: So I will have him to remain till I come, what is it to thee? This is that disciple who giveth testimony of these things and hath written these things: and we know that his testimony is true."

    This excerpt is the Gospel of the Mass of the Feast of St. John the Evangelist, which we celebrated on December 27th. I quote it to call your attention to one verse, verse 23:

    "This saying therefore went abroad among the brethren, that that disciple should not die. And Jesus did not say to him: He should not die; but: 'So I will have him to remain till I come, what is it to thee?'"

I underscore that last sentence: "So I will have him to remain till I come, what is it to thee?"

    You remember that I commented on the Gospel of the Last Sunday after Pentecost, and sought to make the point that we were to read the whole passage as a prediction of the Fall of Jerusalem and understand that Christ wanted all Christians alive at the time, most particularly those who lived in and about Jerusalem, to see in this event His terrible Judgment upon the Jews for their rejection of Himself. The Fall of Jerusalem, therefore, was to be seen as a Return of Christ from Heaven, a "Coming back." The reason I am calling attention to verse 23 of St. Johnís 21st chapter is because in this verse we find Our Lordís very clear confirmation of this fact.

    The first observation we make is the first half of the sentence. Our dear Lord says that it is His determination that St. John will not die "till I come." Christ is the Lord of Life, which He proved by His Resurrection. And if He determines when John the Evangelist will die, He determines the time of everyone elseís death also, regardless of how this death comes about. It is not for us to understand when and why one person dies, or many thousands, or millions. We are to believe that, despite all earthly appearances to the contrary, Christ is the ultimate Master of life and death. For this reason, we pray to Him to deliver us from a "sudden and unprovided death," as the funeral orations says.

    The second observation is that there can be no doubt that the expression, "until I come," does not refer to the end of world, the end of human history on earth, (at which time Christ will come again). We know that John alone of the Apostles was alive at the time of the Fall of Jerusalem; all the other Apostles (including the Apostles Paul and Barnabas) died martyrsí deaths before 70 A.D.

    During the days of Christmas, the Church teaches us to unite with Mary and Joseph in adoring the Incarnate Word. Unlike those outside the Church, we know enough to think clearly on the subject of the Mystery of Christmas, the mystery of the hypostatic union. The Catechism which we studied in grade school is all the theology one needs to reflect on the subject of the Infant Christ. It tells us that in the mystery of the Incarnation, the Second Person of the Blessed Trinity united Himself to a human nature, given to Him by His virginal Mother. Thus, in Christ, there was one Person, the Divine Son of the Father, Who took His divinity from the Eternal Father, and His human nature from Mary. His divine nature was infinite, His human nature was finite. Having a complete human nature, the Lord Jesus had a human soul and body, a human mind and will, all all the emotions peculiar to humans, but not possessed by lower creatures.

    (I probably do not need to remark that discussing the Incarnation--How many natures are there in Christ? What did these natures--if there were more than one--consist of? How could God unite Himself to a human nature? Did Christ have a human mind, a human will, a human memory? Since Christ was a divine Person, how could He die? Etc--with a Protestant would reveal to you that the typical Protestant, including Protestant ministers, would be a completely hopeless effort, as few of them have a clear notion about any of it.. This is why the Conciliarist manipulators could not get the Baltimore Catechism out of the schools quickly enough.)

    The unfathomable mystery of the Incarnation is how the Infinite God can be united to a human nature. In Christ, the union is perfect. He is fully divine and fully human. As divine, He is equal in all respects to the Father, possessing all divine attributes to an infinite degree. He is distinct from the Father by way of His Person, but otherwise the Fatherís Perfect Replica, "God of God, Light of Light, true God of true God." As human, Christ is inferior to the Father, inferior in His nature to the angels.

    As divine, the God Man knows all things, has all power, always was and always will be, and always remains unchanged and unchangeable. As human, He is in all respects like us, except that He was born free of sin and all the other effects of the Sin of Adam and Eve. He is a superior human, to be sure, as He is the New Head of the Race, superseding Adam; and He is its Immortal King and Sovereign. In certain respects, due to the two natures, He was not like us: As man, He knew all things, even menís thoughts, and all future things. As man, He was free of sickness, but not from suffering, nor immortal... Living on earth, suffering the vicissitudes of the weather, putting up with all the limitations of human beings, as well as their faults and sins, submitting to the limitations of His infant state, patiently He passed through the normal stages of growth, from infancy to childhood, to adolescence, to manhood, though during these years, He learned nothing new, He "experienced" human life. As He did not learn anything, His mind was united with the divine mind. He never erred, so that He had to correct Himself. He never said anything other than what He meant to say the first time. He did not labor to express His thought, to choose the right words. Nor to "decide anything. Being the Saint of Saints, His whole being, that is, His divine and human natures, were totally and completely oriented toward the Father, Whose Will He adored and obeyed with a divine perfection.

    In the Sacred Infancy, we find the ultimate contrast in the newborn Child. As God, He had all power; as human, like any other infant, He had to be taken care of in every respect. As divine, He was fully aware of His infant condition, and hid His divinity from all men; even Mary and Joseph, who knew His origin, and the miracle of His Incarnation, lived a life of faith in treating Him always as God, not as a human child. Ordinary infants are aware of the present moment and of what is happening around them, and to them when it occurs. But their memory, being undeveloped, has no recollection of past experiences and happenings a few moments later, for the first two or three or four years of their lives, nor are they able to anticipate future sensations, pains, terrors, experiences.. The Lord Jesus was fully aware of all things always, from the first moment of His conception. For example, whereas other infants who are circumcised at birth, suffer in a minor way, due to their being conscious of the pain only from moment to moment, which is said to be worst for three days, Jesus suffered greatly, as He had a fully developed consciousness. This pain He bore in silence.

    Mary communed with the Child in her womb, not as ordinary mothers experience the growth and infantile movements, of their babies, which are ill-defined. Mary worshipped the Child of Her womb as Her God, and, was aware that He received her adoration, her joyful thanksgiving, and Her immeasurable and most worthy love. Their Hearts were welded during those days and they shall never be sundered.

    Human mothers get to know their children from the moment of their births, and each watches the evolution of her childís unique personality. As children become more "defined" as individuals, mothers observe the personality of their child taking on "definition" during their infantile years. There was no "development" of Jesusí "personality;" rather Mary observed and pondered and adored as He revealed Himself. There was nothing like "immaturity" in Him, even on the day of His birth. Neither was there a "maturation," or "reaction" to the place and circumstances in which He happened to be, for He had always been everywhere.

    During the days of Christmas, most of all we marvel at the mystery of the Incarnation, and all that it means. That the infinite God would become a man, would enter human history, would reduce Himself to being another individual among the millions on earth, and conceal Himself among His people until the time for His self-revelation arrived, provides us with cause for endless, speechless amazement. What Holy Mother Church wishes to elicit from us through the renewal and celebration of this August Mystery is a spirit of adoration and self-effacement. Mary and Joseph were chosen to be the God Childís parents because theirs was a perfect creatural response to this ineffable condescension of the all-high God. Pray to Mary, bowed before Him in the manger, presenting Him to the Magi as the King of the Jews and Savior of all men, and caressing Him warmly and protectively on the Flight into Egypt.

_________________

    On a personal note, I had to go to the hospital again. Again, there was a great buildup of fluid in the chest cavity which had to be removed. It is hoped that the chemotherapy will suppress the lymphoma, which is the cause of this buildup. I don't like what things have come to , this is the way they are. I continue to beg for prayers, striving always to resign myself to the divine will, which is always good and wise. Again, I thank everyone who has remembered me with prayers and felicitations and gifts during these feast days (which are now called nothing more than "holidays."--the Jews snap their fingers, and we Christians jump through the hoops like good little goyim, or well-trained dogs.) I receive no kind consideration without a painful inadequacy of gratitude. I send everyone my prayer to the Infant King to rule your hearts and wills through His tender love.

In Christ,

    For past articles of Making Sense of Sensus Catholicus, see 2004ssc.htm Archives
    January 4, 2005
    vol 16, no. 4
    Making Sense of Sensus Catholicus