January 1, 2004
Feast of The Circumcision
vol. 16, no. 1

"Cleansing for Himself an Acceptable People"   Titus 2: 14

Even as an infant, Christ was obedient to His Father and foster father. Circumcision symbolized a cleansing in the Old Covenant; in the New Covenant, Christ shed the first drop of His Most Precious Blood at His Circumcision in order to cleanse for Himself an acceptable people. The acceptable people must be in the state of grace to receive His merits. Unfortunately in these times, that is a medieval concept no longer believed by newChurch, but held always by the Almighty.

    "Fr. Dörmann laments: 'The crucial problem for today's believing Catholic is: The Pope views this 'new, more broad-minded perspective' of the truly 'Catholic universality' of the faith, which Vatican II gave to the 'Church of the future,' merely as a deeper, more complete grasp of the old faith. A Catholic can choose either to view the new perspective as the Pope does, or to admit that a break with tradition has indeed occurred, and what is more, that a substantially new faith has indeed arisen. The question is whether he should disregard all doctrinal concerns, and simply accompany the Pope on his pilgrimage to the 'mystical mountain' in Assisi, or whether he should shudder at the thought of it' (p.36)."

      Editor's Note: In Father Louis Campbell's sermon for the Feast of the Circumcision of Our Lord, He illustrates how Christ, through the obedience of His Blessed Mother and foster father St. Joseph to the old traditions, was cleansed through Circumcision, the first bloodletting by our Savior Who came into this world to save souls and, as the Apostle Paul affirms in Titus 2: 14, Cleansing for Himself an Acceptable People. Yet, where is the cleansing of grace today in the modern conciliar church? Father points out the futility of John Paul II's strange and foreign-to-Catholic ears theology and Vatican II bafflegab. Father cites through the infallible Word of Scripture, St. Irenaeus, and the eye-opening exposé published by a very respectable priest the inanity and insanity of newChurch's concepts of Catholicism. There is no 'Civilization of Love' without grace and belief in only one religion - that founded by Jesus Christ Who was like us in all ways, except sin. Yet He subjected Himself to the humiliation of the Cross which began with His circumcision, a feast incidentally and purposefully eliminated by the conciliar church. Father explains in his sermon today. [bold and italics below are editor's emphasis.]

    The message of the Feast of the Circumcision of Our Lord is to put off the "old man" of the earthly generation, born of Adam and Eve, which is dead, having died of Adam's sin, and put on the new man of the new generation, born again of water and the Spirit, whose Head is Jesus Christ, the New Adam. We are a new race whose home is in Heaven. The earthly generation are motivated by pride, greed, lust, revenge, anger and hatred. Those who are born again of water and the Spirit are motivated by love of God and hope of Heaven. They do not tempt their fellow human beings with utopian fantasies of a "civilization of love" here on earth, but trouble and harass them by preaching to them the Gospel of Salvation, so that they too might have hope of eternal life.

    In the New Church we find a "more broad-minded ecclesiology." The Conciliar Church has dropped the idea of the supernatural and makes no distinction between nature and grace. Human beings are born in the state of original justice, and are all destined for Heaven. All men belong to "the Church of the living God." Fr. Johannes Dörmann describes the "New Theology" in his exposé of John Paul II's new doctrine of Universal Salvation:

    "All men belong to the Church of the living God: It is all cultures and religions which make up the people of God, who are on pilgrimage towards the same transcendental goal, as was symbolically expressed at Assisi (where representatives of the world religions met to pray with John Paul II in 1986). It is the mystical body of Christ in the wider sense, which in virtue of the Incarnation includes all mankind. It is the Church of 'anonymous Christianity,' which has not yet become aware of its nature… This Church, made up of all churches and church communities, is the 'ecumenical Church.' One of these is the Conciliar Church, which re-defined her own essence at Vatican II in the following terms: 'The Church, in Christ, is in the nature of sacrament - a sign and instrument, that is, of communion with God and of unity among all men' (Lumen Gentium, 1,1)" (Fr. Johannes Dörmann, Pope John Paul II's Theological Journey to the Prayer Meeting of Religions in Assisi, Part II, v.i, pp.34,35).

    The New Church, then, is no longer the Ark of Salvation to which all must belong in order to be saved, but merely the "sign" or "sacrament" of the unity of all men. Although Jesus Christ said: "He who believes and is baptized shall be saved, but he who does not believe shall be condemned" (Mark.16:16), the Gospel is no longer preached for the conversion of the nations, but simply to proclaim that all are saved, and are on their way to eternal life. Faith in Jesus Christ, and Baptism, are now optional.

    If this were true, then it would make sense to seek solidarity with all men, and to try to build "a civilization of love." But the idea of solidarity with all men is sentimental slop. There is no civilization of love possible except in the Body of Christ, the Church, where those who are being saved find life. Jesus said to a certain man: "'Follow me.' But he said, 'Lord, let me first go and bury my father.' But Jesus said to him, 'Let the dead bury their dead, but do thou go and proclaim the kingdom of God'" (Luke 9:59,60).

    It is from a spiritually dead humanity, dead through Adam's sin, that Jesus Christ must "cleanse for Himself an acceptable people, pursuing good works" (Tit.2:14). Not all will believe, and not all will persevere in grace, for "No one, having put his hand to the plow and looking back, is fit for the kingdom of God" (Luke 9:62).

    St. Irenaeus comments:

    "Those then, as many as they be, who have not that which saves and forms [us] into life [eternal], shall be, and shall be called, [mere] flesh and blood; for these are they who have not the Spirit of God in themselves. Wherefore men of this stamp are spoken of by the Lord as 'dead;' for, says He, 'Let the dead bury their dead,' because they have not the Spirit which quickens man. On the other hand, as many as fear God and trust in His Son's advent, and who through faith do establish the Spirit of God in their hearts - such men as these shall be properly called both 'pure,' and 'spiritual,' and 'those living to God,' because they possess the Spirit of the Father, who purifies man, and raises him up to the life of God" (St. Irenaeus of Lyons, Adversus Haereses, Book V, Chapter 9).

    In traditional Catholic theology, the life of God in man is called Grace, the gratuitous gift of God given through the Sacrament of Baptism, by which we are freed from Original Sin and made just and holy partakers of the divine nature, as the Roman Catechism explains:

    "The grace of justification, which signs us with the Holy Spirit of promise, who is the pledge of our inheritance, transcends all His other most ample gifts. It unites us to God in the closest bonds of love, lights up within us the sacred flame of piety, forms us to newness of life, renders us partakers of the divine nature, and enables us to be called and really to be the sons of God" (The Catechism of the Council of Trent, Tan Books, 1982, p. 95).

    Fr. Dörmann laments: "The crucial problem for today's believing Catholic is: The Pope views this 'new, more broad-minded perspective' of the truly 'Catholic universality' of the faith, which Vatican II gave to the 'Church of the future,' merely as a deeper, more complete grasp of the old faith. A Catholic can choose either to view the new perspective as the Pope does, or to admit that a break with tradition has indeed occurred, and what is more, that a substantially new faith has indeed arisen. The question is whether he should disregard all doctrinal concerns, and simply accompany the Pope on his pilgrimage to the 'mystical mountain' in Assisi, or whether he should shudder at the thought of it" (p.36).

    We shudder at the thought of it! But our faith assures us: "The grace of God our Savior has appeared to all men, instructing us, in order that, rejecting ungodliness and worldly lusts, we may live temperately and justly and piously in this world; looking for the blessed hope and glorious coming of our great God and Savior, Jesus Christ, who gave himself for us that he might redeem us from all iniquity and cleanse for himself an acceptable people, pursuing good works" (Titus 2:11:15).

    "Amen! Come, Lord Jesus!" (Apoc.22:20).

Father Louis J. Campbell


January 1, 2005
vol 16, no. 1
"Qui legit, intelligat"
Father Louis Campbell's Sunday Sermons