GABRIEL'S CLARION (apr18gab.htm)
MONDAY
April 18, 2005
vol 16, no. 108
True Catholic Defiance

The Desecration of Tolerance

    Part Four

True Catholics, in the spirit of their saintly ancestors of times past, can turn tolerance into a tide of zeal for upholding the True Faith in the face of adversity. It takes guts and grace!

      "The second of these two final definitions of tolerance, however, tells us that tolerance can also be the relative capacity of an organism to grow and thrive when subjected to an unfavorable environment. Is this not what happened to Christianity and the Catholic faith in particular? Is its history not merely such an example of thriving under adversity? Is it not clear that such growth has been so only because it has been blessed and guided by The Almighty? Likewise, is it not abundantly clear that once such blessing and guidance is removed or violated, such progress will end and even be reversed? If the progress of our faith is toward salvation, then clearly the reversal of that progress must be toward perdition and is that not the present direction of this society and even our faith?"

    Once we have seen and discussed how sacred and original tolerance have been defiled into the present illogical myth commonly called tolerance today, we may ask ourselves what any true Catholic response to that profanation must be. In this fourth and final segment of this series, this response will be outlined as the only possible reaction by anyone claiming to be a true follower of Christ or seeking above all to love, obey, and respect God Almighty.

Rebirth of Original Divinity

    First of all, as true Catholics we must always strive to regain and redevelop that original, true, and sacred tolerance discussed at the start of this series. This tolerance recognizes that there is great disparity in this world and society and is able to analyze and compare that disparity. In this sense one is showing respect for the critical importance of these differences and for the potential harm of these errors. Contrary to present tolerance, which seeks to ignore or gloss over differences, conflicts, and errors, the true Catholic must render greater respect to the issue in general and the threat in particular of these differences and conflicts. Only in respecting the threat of the enemy can we adequately prepare for that enemy.

    Secondly, we must immerse ourselves in the arguments and proper defense of our beliefs and practices. It is not enough to know that others have contrary beliefs that we feel are wrong. We must be able to articulate how and why those other beliefs are wrong or contrary to ours. This is the beginning of reflecting the ability of St. Paul to seek conversion, for we cannot possibly hope to convert when we cannot even argue or persuade conversion.

    Thirdly, we must steadfastly and bravely stand our ground as to what we believe and practice. It does little help to recognize disparity and error and to be able to explain how one's beliefs and practices differ from that disparity if one's beliefs and practices shift and waver in the process. One will either end up converting others and oneself to something other than the truth or, conversely, one will undermine the certainty of that truth itself.

    Fourthly, one must be prepared to answer and fight the common arguments presented by one's opponents as to one's beliefs, views, and practices. Any good debater knows that the best offense is a complete preparation and immersion in the opponent's likely positions and arguments against one's positions.

    Fifth, one must truly have zeal and be passionate about the salvation of people as St. Paul was. One cannot show the endurance and commitment to saving souls if one either does not really care about saving souls or does not have the stomach to put up with, to endure, yes, to tolerate saving souls.

Separation of People From Ideas

    A common tactic of the evil one in today's society is to muddy up the waters in arguments thus creating all kinds of confusion and blurring what is right and wrong. Present tolerance has blurred the distinction between people and their ideas by creating the impression that recognizing the inferiority of ideas and beliefs is proclaiming the inferiority of people. By then citing that Christ said we are all children of God, these people then claim that intolerance is evil because it degrades people and places some above others.

    In fact, true tolerance is not about people but rather their ideas, beliefs and practices. It argues that not all ideas, beliefs, and practices are valid and that some are superior to others. It then calls for some restraint, respect, compassion, and patience in dealing with these disparities in the name of Christ-like charity and mercy. However, it at no point calls for surrender or submission or capitulation of one's conscience or moral code.

    Just as Christ could exhibit tolerance when faced with a foolish question yet stand firm with the scribes and moneychangers, so too we must be able to draw and stick to our line in the sand! Once we rightly separate this discussion showing that tolerance is about judging ideas, beliefs, and practices and not the people who hold them, we are back on track away from the devil's cunning lies.

Two Last Definitions

    Two final definitions of tolerance found in the dictionary provide us with a fitting final guideline for how we must respond as true Catholics to the moral, rational, and eternal onslaught that is the present distortion of tolerance. One such definition tells us that tolerance can also be the ability of a body to become less responsive to a substance when repeatedly faced or exposed to that substance, as in the case when one becomes tolerant of an antibiotic rendering it useless or an insect or virus becomes tolerant of a poison or drug rendering that poison or drug useless in combating that insect or virus. This is generally considered a negative and destructive thing and rightly so, for it implies that one has lost a defense or a weapon against harm or that one can no longer respond as one should to that harm. Is this not what can easily happen to us if we allow this society to lure us into a moral hypnosis and stupor under which our capacity to respond to evil, error, and profanity is dulled? Likewise, can we not become "immune" to the Word of God or Christ's message if we allow our exposure to that Word and example to lose its deeper meanings?

    The second of these two final definitions of tolerance, however, tells us that tolerance can also be the relative capacity of an organism to grow and thrive when subjected to an unfavorable environment. Is this not what happened to Christianity and the Catholic faith in particular? Is its history not merely such an example of thriving under adversity? Is it not clear that such growth has been so only because it has been blessed and guided by The Almighty? Likewise, is it not abundantly clear that once such blessing and guidance is removed or violated, such progress will end and even be reversed? If the progress of our faith is toward salvation, then clearly the reversal of that progress must be toward perdition and is that not the present direction of this society and even our faith?

Conclusion

    Given all of the observations and arguments presented in this series on tolerance, it becomes obvious that only by returning to the original, pure and sacred definition of tolerance will we regain the glory of that term as intended by God Almighty. Likewise, we must never surrender what we stand for and what the purpose of our mission here on earth is even when faced with all of the lies, cunning, and treachery of the evil one. Like St. Paul, we are called to use our talents to save souls. This purpose and mission demands sacred tolerance. It cannot exist if chained in the distorted, demonic tolerance now preached by this lost society!

Gabriel Garnica

For past installments in this series on the "The Desecration of Tolerance" see


Editor's Note: Heaven is once again under attack by those who would seek to ignore and overthrow God's majesty and authority. Gabriel Garnica, educator and attorney, submits regular insights and commentaries to remind and help guide readers toward a deeper and more assertive faith. Touching on topics and issues ranging from personal faith, doctrine, education, scripture, the media, family life, morality, and values, Gabriel's notes are music to traditional ears but unpleasant tones to those who have bought into the misguided notions so prevalent and spreading in today's Catholic world.


    Gabriel's Clarion
    April 18, 2005
    Volume 16, no. 108