"Qui legit, intelligat" Sunday Sermons (40425qui.htm)


April 25, 2004
SUNDAY
Feast of St. Mark the Evangelist
vol 15, no. 116

An Uncertain Sound

Chomp! Blot! Blot! Chomp! Blot! Swoosh!

Christians of the Coliseum recognize the sound. They would not submit to its siren unlike today's surrenderers. Sadly today satan mocks the Lionized mark of St. Mark with the silent roar of Gehenna through the omissions of the Word as the New Order beasts roar and clamor for more blood and guts by gutting the Gospel to suit their voracious appetites of preying on the comfort zones of the clueless Novus Ordinarian.

    "Consider the effect this has had upon preaching. Priests, who may not even suspect what has been done to the readings, are tricked into observing the hidden agenda of the revolutionaries by being required, or at least expected, to preach on the assigned Sunday readings. What you get from many priests, who don't have much time to prepare their sermons anyway, is nice little 'ferverinos' about how Jesus loves the little children, but with little doctrinal substance, and little if anything at all about sin, Judgment, or Hell."

      Editor's Note: In Father Louis Campbell's sermon for the Double of the Second Class Feast of St. Mark the Evangelist represented by the Lion. This year this feast supersedes the Second Sunday After Easter, also known as 'Good Shepherd' Sunday. Father shows the ravaging done by the new lions, those out to claw and gut the Word of God so that no substance of the Last Four Things remain for it might offend someone. He shares our colleague Jacob Michael's findings in his work Gutting the Gospels, part of his upcoming book (see preview at Out of Sight, Out of Mind: Mangling Matthew), whereby Jacob identifies numerous significant passages that are omitted or altered to accommodate political correctness of today for the New Order dare not offend anyone, never mind how much they offend God, which Father assures will not go well for those who have abandoned the fullness of the Sacred Scriptures, what Mark wrote of, and the infrangibility of the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass. As a programming note, Jacob has handed over the reins to Kevin Tierney in continuing the series Lex Orandi, Lex Credendi which will point out more of these omissions for each Sunday and which will resume next week. In the meantime that noise in the distance which is growing harsher - no matter how many are trying to hush it - is coming from the depths and the "Civilization of Love" is about to implode from the demonic decibels which will be certain in the end for Christ asserts this in Matthew 25: 41, yet for those who persist in their stubborn blindness and deafness it remains An Uncertain Sound. [bold and italics below are editor's emphasis.]

    St. Mark, whose feast we celebrate today, was the author of the Second Gospel, which is a record of the preaching of the Prince of the Apostles, St. Peter. St. Mark was writing for the gentile converts to Christianity in Rome sometime before the year 60 A. D. He begins with the words: "The beginning of the gospel of Jesus Christ, the Son of God," his main purpose being to convince his readers of the Divinity of Christ. Accordingly, about a quarter of his Gospel is taken up with colorful accounts of the miracles of Jesus, eighteen of them being recorded, so as to show Christ's almighty power and dominion over all nature.

    The Gospel of St. Mark makes clear the necessity of faith and Baptism, beginning with the baptism of repentance preached by John the Baptist at the river Jordan, and concluding with the final command of Jesus to His Apostles: "Go into the whole world and preach the gospel to every creature. He who believes and is baptized shall be saved, but he who does not believe shall be condemned" (Mk.16:15-16). It also deals with the conflict between Jesus and his adversaries, the Scribes and the Pharisees, the necessity of detachment from the things of the world, of prayer and self-denial for the sake of the Kingdom of God.

    But suppose I should say, "I am not pleased with everything I find in this Gospel. After all, if it was written for the Christians of the Rome of the first century, it should be adapted to allow it to speak to the people of this age." So I take my black marker and begin to delete certain passages that I find offensive. We want a nice Jesus who talks about love and forgiveness, not a judgmental Jesus. Since we don't want to appear anti-Semitic, we blot out passages where Jesus seems to be too hard on the Scribes and the Pharisees. Blot! Blot! We don't want to scare the kids or make the adults feel bad about their lives, so we censor everything that Jesus says about sin, Judgment and Hell. Blot! And who believes in miracles these days anyway, so lets blot out the miracles. Blot! Blot!

    No doubt this sounds like a preposterous idea. It just couldn't be done. Or could it? One of The Daily Catholic's regular writers Jacob Michael has written an article entitled Gutting the Gospels: The Sacrilegious Stripping of the Novus Ordo Lectionary. He asks us to "carefully consider whether the NOM (Novus Ordo Mass) is not truly a wholesale revolution, calculated to de-Catholicize the Christian world through constant exposure to a lop-sided liturgy, and in particular, through an imbalanced presentation of the Gospels." He found that significant passages, "certain verses, sometimes entire sections of verses in fact, were just simply missing from the Lectionary." Writing only of the Sunday readings, he says:

       "Time after time, I found the exact same thing: the verses that had been excised from the Lectionary consistently dealt with the same subjects. In every case, the offending verses spoke of miracles that could not be otherwise explained by natural causes, of Our Lord's continual confrontation with the Jews and the Jewish leaders, of the uselessness of material goods and worldly wealth, of the necessity of self-denial and bodily mortification, of sin and the possibility of damnation, of hell, of the role of women in the home and in the Church, and other such subjects that would normally be deemed 'offensive' to modern ears.

       "The same patterns could be detected equally in the Gospels and epistles alike! In the process of giving the faithful a 'more complete' bible, the revolutionaries had managed to completely strip the Sacred Scriptures of anything that offended Modern Man, of anything that was ... well, 'too Catholic'.

       "I firmly believe that, having examined the content of these readings several times, these clear patterns are in no way coincidental. The passages were (as it becomes clear upon close scrutiny and examining the Lectionary on the whole) very skillfully and deliberately edited in order to present a Christ and Christendom that in no way conflicts with Modern Man's inclinations. The Christ of the New Lectionary is loving, joyful, peaceful, calling all men to life, inviting all men to participate in the resurrection, exhorting us to love each other and help the needy. In short, the New Christ is fully humanitarian, the quintessential member (and founder) of the Civilization of Love."

   Consider the effect this has had upon preaching. Priests, who may not even suspect what has been done to the readings, are tricked into observing the hidden agenda of the revolutionaries by being required, or at least expected, to preach on the assigned Sunday readings. What you get from many priests, who don't have much time to prepare their sermons anyway, is nice little "ferverinos" about how Jesus loves the little children, but with little doctrinal substance, and little if anything at all about sin, Judgment, or Hell.

    The impact upon the people is devastating. They hear about a kinder, gentler Jesus, but little on His teachings about the sobering realities of life. As St. Paul says, "If the trumpet gives forth an uncertain sound, who will prepare for battle?" (1Cor.15:8). How will the people be able to fight the spiritual battle against the demonic forces of this age, let alone prepare for eternal life? As it is, they are like sheep without a shepherd, scattered and devoured by the wolves. Many of them are satisfied with the New Order. They have been subjected to an "extreme makeover" and have become New World Order drones. Pray for your Novus Ordo friends!

    The Traditional Mass, with only a one-year cycle of readings, nevertheless gives us a balanced view of the Scriptures, nothing downplayed, nothing omitted. St. Mark could tell us. We hear about the Jesus Who heals the sick and raises the dead, about the Jesus Who walks on water and multiplies the loaves and the fishes. We hear too about the Jesus Who judges the unbelievers and assigns them to Hell, Who condemns those who love pleasure and power and riches more than the Kingdom of God, and Who with a word of His mouth drives out Satan and his demonic horde. This is Christ the King Who will come to judge the living and the dead. He will say to the goats on His left: "Depart from Me, accursed ones, into the everlasting fire which was prepared for the devil and his angels" (Mt.25:41), but to the sheep on His right: "Come, blessed of My Father, take possession of the kingdom prepared for you from the foundation of the world" (Mt.25:34).

Father Louis J. Campbell

For the Low Sunday Proper for the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass, see Protexisti


April 25, 2004
vol 15, no. 116
"Qui legit, intelligat"
Father Louis Campbell's Sunday Sermons

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