DAILY CATHOLIC     FRI-SAT-SUN     February 5-7, 1999     vol. 10, no. 25

NEWS & VIEWS
from a CATHOLIC perspective

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MEXICAN BISHOP RESPONDS TO ATTACKS AGAINST THE CHURCH AND THE HOLY FATHER AND CLEARS UP POPE'S REMARKS ON "INDIAN THEOLOGY"

          MEXICO CITY, 4 (NE) The former bishop of the Mexican diocese of Papantla, Bishop Genaro Alamilla Arteaga, wrote an article in defense of the Church and the Holy Father in his last visit to Mexico answering the critics recently received from various sectors. "A moral and world leader, a leader of concord and of peace, a leader of forgiveness and reconciliation, and above all, a herald of truth and overwhelming promoter and defender of the human rights, had to get in the face to some who due to their reckless living in search of wealth at any price, or because of their unlimited desire for power, or, even, for their immoral way of living, do not stand some truths being talked about," explained Bishop Alamilla.

          He said that the slanders sustained against him were but "vain voices and innocuous writings" written by people "ignorant, anticlerical and extremely liberal but already out of date." The Bishop also pointed out that "on the other hand the reasonable people, free and even non believing welcomed the Pope's messages with approval, some even made purpose of taking them to practice and others even decided to change the direction of their lives." Later on he pointed out that the warm welcoming to the Holy Father and his message, can be in no way considered as "fanaticism nor fetishism, even less as idolatry, as some stubbornly said," it is rather a sample of the validity of the "social doctrine of the Church that doesn't have its origin in any political party or ideology, but rather in the Gospel."

          In a related story, the Archdiocese of Mexico City has issued a statement of clarification explaining critical remarks by Pope John Paul II about "Indian theology" in Mexico.

          During his plane trip to Mexico last week, the Holy Father told reporters that while liberation theology was no longer a crucial influence, the "Indian theology" promoted by some Mexican Catholic leaders-- particularly in the troubled region of Chiapas-- is also a matter for concern, because it involves "another version of Marxism."

          Remarkably enough, the controversial Bishop Samuel Ruiz Garcia, who is generally identified as a proponent of "Indian theology," claimed to find support in the Pope's remarks. In support of that interpretation, he noted the Pontiff's strong statements of support for the Indian peoples of Mexico.

          The Archdiocese of Mexico City, seeking to resolve the debate, has issued a statement explaining while Pope John Paul fully supports the rights of Indians, he rejects "Indian theology" insofar as it "tends toward Marxism and class confrontation."

          "John Paul II energetically condemned the attempt to replace liberation theology with Indian theology, of Marxist inspiration, which is obviously not in accordance with the teachings of the Catholic Church," the archdiocesan statement concludes. "The route to solution of our nation's social and economic problems, the Pontiff says, lies in solidarity."


Articles provided through Catholic World News and Church News at Noticias Eclesiales. Both CWN and NE are not affiliated with the Daily CATHOLIC but provides this service via e-mail to the Daily CATHOLIC Monday through Friday.

February 5, 1999       volume 10, no. 25
NEWS & VIEWS

DAILY CATHOLIC

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