MONDAY
January 8, 2001
volume 12, no. 8
This Day in Church History


  • 1198 A.D.
  • Death of Pope Celestine III, 175th successor of Peter whose pontificate lasted seven years. He sustained the indissolubility of marriage and gave official approval to the Order of the Teutonic Knights whose principal duty was to defend the pilgrims in the Holy Land.

  • 1198 A.D.
  • Election of Pope Innocent III, 176th successor of Peter. He was elected on the very same day his predecessor died, even though he did not officially take control until February 22nd. He was a man of great quality and would to on to exert an enormous influence, reestablishing his temporal authority within the Papal states and actively promoting the Fourth Crusade as well as calling the 12th Ecumenical Council in 1215, also called Lateran IV.

  • 1455 A.D.
  • Death of Saint Laurence Giustiniani, Archbishop and Patriarch of Venice whose preaching and good works to all the people made him legendary in northern Italy. Also known as Lorenzo Justiniani, he died in Venice on this date and was canonized by Pope Clement X in 1670.

  • 1642 A.D.
  • Death of Galileo Galilei at 77 years-old. This Italian physicist and astronomer's theories clashed with Rome at the time during an age when faith and reason weren't exactly meshing. It would be centuries before the Holy See would reconcile with Galileo who many consider the father of the modern sciences.

  • 1904 A.D.
  • Pope Saint Pius X decides low cut dresses are not appropriate in church since it not only distracts others but goes against the virtues and example of the Blessed Virgin Mary and thus, the holy 257th successor of Peter bans all low-cut bodices at Holy Mass. Today the Vatican still prohibits any shorts, mini-skirts or low-cut dresses or bikini-tops inside St. Peter's, including tourists.


January 8, 2001
volume 12, no. 8
DAILY TIME CAPSULES



Return to Front Page of Current Issue