THURSDAY    January 6, 2000   vol. 11, no. 4   SECTION ONE

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One doesn't have to flip the proverbial coin to discover why ultra-conservatives are as clueless as liberals and modernists when it comes to what Vatican II was really all about!

    In his column today, Pat Ludwa gives equal time to the other side of the coin regarding Vatican II. In an eye-opening treatise he shows how ultra-conservative Catholics resent Vatican II because they also misinterpret the intent and actual decrees adopted by the Council Fathers. They join the liberals and modernists in going to extremes by blaming Pope John XXIII and Pope Paul VI for allowing it to happen and our present Holy Father Pope John Paul II for carrying out the directives of the Second Vatican Council. Pat clears up the truth with documents from both Vatican II and the Council of Trent in one of his most insightful columns ever. He shows the wisdom of the addage that one can leave the Church through either the left door or the right door, proving that the best course is to stay in the center, not as a liberal Catholic or a conservative Catholic, but a Roman Catholic! For his column today, Why Vatican II? The other side of the coin. , click on VIEW FROM THE PEW

Why Vatican II? The other side of the coin

Pope reminds the world on World Day of Peace that there can be no peace unless all share in it and follow Christ's call

    In 2000 we will be bringing you the Holy Father's words twice a week enabling us to bring you his weekly Wednesday Papal audiences on Mondays and his Sunday Angelus address on Thursdays. Today, we bring you the words from His Holiness Pope John Paul II for his first Angelus address given on the very first day of the new millennium on the Solemnity of Mary, Mother of God and World Peace Day. His brief address reiterates Christ's call to cross the threshold and place our trust in Him. He also invokes the guidance of Mary for her special feast which ties in with the need for peace throughout the world. For that reason the Holy Father reminds all of the plight of the less fortunate in many countries where peace is only a word and persecution or famine rule the day. For the Pope's words on his first First Angelus of the Millennium, click on THE VICAR OF CHRIST SPEAKS.

SUNDAY ANGELUS FROM JANUARY 1, 2000


Appreciation of the Gospel of Saint Luke

       Today we continue with our new series in the search to uncover the wonderful treasures of the Church contained in the great Deposit of Faith. We feature today the third of the four Evangelists - the physician Saint Luke, often symbolized by the Ox for that represented the animal of sacrifice and he begins his Gospel with the sacrifice of Zachary. His feast day is celebrated on October 18. For the eighty-second installment, click on APPRECIATING THE PRECIOUS GIFT OF OUR FAITH

Gospel of Saint Luke

    Saint Luke was born at Antioch, Syria, according to the Church historian Eusebius. He was a Gentile by girth (Colossians 4, 10-14) and a physician by profession (Col. 4, 14). According to a legend of the sixth century he was also a painter.

    He was one of the earliest converts to the faith and later became the missinoary companion of Saint Paul, whom he accompanied on part of his second and third missionary journeys (Acts 16, 10-17; 20, 5-21), and attended during the Caesaraen (Acts 24, 23) and Roman captivities (Acts 27-28; Col. 4, 14). Little is known with certainty of his subsequent life.

    The unanimous traditon of the Church ascribes the third Gospel to St. Luke. Allusions to and citations from the Gospel are most frequent in early Christian writings, and even heretics made diligent use of this inspired book. The Gospel itself shows that its author was a person of literary powers, a physician and a companion of St. Paul.

    This Gospel was written before the destruction of Jerusalem, 70 A.D., for it does not refer to the fulfillment of Christ's prophecy. Since the Acts of the Apostles closes its narrative with the year 63 or 64 A.D., the Gospel of St. Luke, his first book, must have been written prior to 63 A.D.

    Little is known with certainty about the place of composiiton. Some of the ancient authors suggest Achaia (Greece); some of the manuscripts mention Alexandria or Macedonia; while modern writers also defend Caesarea, Epheus or Rome.

    The Gospel is addressed to a certain Theophilus, a man of conspicuous rank or ofice. Indirectly, however, this Sacred Writing was intended for the Gentile converts. The purpose of the Gospel is clearly indicated in the prologue (1, 1-4). These converts from paganism had received instruction before Baptism. St. Luke wishes now to give them a deeper and more accurate knowledge of the truths of their religion, and at the same time to show them on what a firm basis their faith is founded. There are some characteristic features that are accentuated more by St. Luke than by the other evangelists. Many of these show the influence of St. Paul. The theme of the universality of salvation can be considered as running through the Gospel. Divine forgiveness and salvation are offered to all. The Gospel also sharply contrasts the position of pagan and Jewish womanhood, and presents many types of womanhood to its readers. The subject of prayer is also stressed. Not only does the evangelist record more frequently than the others Christ as an example of prayer, but also His instructions on prayer. As an artist St. Luke shows his skill in portraying living characters and he has remained an inspiration to painters for centuries. As a historian he is comparable with the great Green and Latin writers. In his Gospel there is a steady movement of events from Nazareth to Jerusalem, whereas in the Acts it is from Jerusalem to Rome. St. Luke was born at Antioch, Syria, according to the Church historian Eusebius. He was a Gentile by girth (Col. 4, 10-14) and a physician by profession (Col. 4, 14). According to a legend of the sixth century he was also a painter.

    He was one of the earliest converts to the faith and later became the missinoary companion of St. Paul, whom he accompanied on part of his second and third missionary journeys (Acts 16, 10-17; 20, 5-21), and attended during the Caesaraen (Acts 24, 23) and Roman captivities (Acts 27-28; Col. 4, 14). Little is nown with certainty of his subsequent life.

    The unamious traditon of the Church ascribes the third Gospel to St. Luke. Allusions to and citations from the Gospel are most frequent in early Christian writings, and even heretics made diligent use of this inspired book. The Gospel itself shows that its author was a person of literary powers, a physician and a companion of St. Paul.

    This Gospel was written before the destruction of Jerusalem, 70 A.D., for it does not refer to the fulfillment of Christ's prophecy. Since the Acts of the Apostles closes its narrative with the year 63 or 64 A.D., the Gospel of St. Luke, his first book, must have been written prior to 63 A.D.

    Little is known with certainty about the place of composiiton. Some of the ancient authors suggest Achaia (Greece); some of the manuscripts mention Alexandria or Macedonia; while modern writers also defend Caesarea, Epheus or Rome.

    The Gospel is addressed to a certain Theophilus, a man of conspicuous rank or ofice. Indirectly, however, this Sacred Writing was intended for the Gentile converts. The purpose of the Gospel is clearly indicated in the prologue (1, 1-4). These converts from paganism had received instruction before Baptism. St. Luke wishes now to give them a deeper and more accurate knowledge of the truths of their religion, and at the same time to show them on what a firm basis their faith is founded. There are some characteristic features that are accentuated more by St. Luke than by the other evangelists. Many of these show the influence of St. Paul. The theme of the universality of salvation can be considered as running through the Gospel. Divine forgiveness and salvation are offered to all. The Gospel also sharply contrasts the position of pagan and Jewish womanhood, and presents many types of womanhood to its readers. The subject of prayer is also stressed. Not only does the evangelist record more frequently than the others Christ as an example of prayer, but also His instructions on prayer. As an artist St. Luke shows his skill in portraying living characters and he has remained an inspiration to painters for centuries. As a historian he is comparable with the great Green and Latin writers. In his Gospel there is a steady movement of events from Nazareth to Jerusalem, whereas in the Acts it is from Jerusalem to Rome.

Tomorrow: The Gospel of Saint John


Our neighbor is only as good as we make them!

    They say a picture is worth a thousand words, but the words of Bishop Fulton J. Sheen have been known to launch a thousand images in one's mind, one of the ways this late luminary did so much to evangelize the faith. Because of the urgency of the times and because few there are today who possess the wisdom, simplicity and insight than the late Archbishop who touched millions, we are bringing you daily gems from his writings. The good bishop makes it so simple that we have dubbed this daily series: "SIMPLY SHEEN".

"Love gives incentive to betterment. When the other thinks well of us, we try to be worthy of that opinion. The fact that others assume us to be good is a great incentive to goodness. That is why, too, one of the basic principles of life ought to be to assume goodness in others; thus we make them good."


December 25th Medjugorje Monthly Message

    Dear children! This is the time of grace. Little children, today in a special way with little Jesus, Whom I hold in my embrace, I am giving you the possibility to decide for peace.Through your 'yes' for peace and your decision for God, a new possibility for peace is opened. Only in this way, little children, this century will be for you a time of peace and well-being. Therefore, put little newborn Jesus in the first place in your life and He will lead you on the way of salvation. Thank you for having responded to my call.

For more on Medjugorje, click on MEDJUGORJE AND MORE

The DAILY WORD

"The Spirit of the Lord is upon Me because He has anointed Me; to bring good news to the poor He has sent Me, to proclaim to the captives release, and sight to the blind; to set at liberty the oppressed, to proclaim the acceptable year of the Lord, and the day of recompense."

Luke 4: 18-19


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January 6, 2000     volume 11, no. 4
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