December 4, 2005
Sunday
vol. 16, no. 308

"Joy and Peace in Believing"   Romans 15: 13

    While Jesus asked the multitudes in today's Gospel what they went into the desert to see in referring to the one who would make way the path of the Lord, and while the Apostle Paul expresses joy and peace for those who believe, Benedict XVI is living up to his Benedict Arnold traits for, along with his conciLIAR cohorts, he is once again betraying Christ and His Church by accommodating non-believers in their heresy and in his protestant-like decision to do away with Limbo.

"It should be noted that 'nonbelievers' or 'unbelievers' in current Vatican usage refers to those who have no belief at all in any kind of god. The representatives of the false religions who assembled in Assisi for John Paul II's prayer meeting in 1986, were all considered 'believers'. Now all one needs is a 'desire for the transcendent.' Clearly, the defined Church doctrine, 'Outside the Church there is no salvation,' is among the many casualties of Vatican II."

      Editor's Note: In Father Louis Campbell's sermon for the Second Sunday of Advent, he makes it very clear that only in the One, Holy, Catholic and Apostolic Church is salvation possible by citing Sacred Scripture and asking why don't the conciliarists take Jesus at His word. It is not surprising then, as we enter "Commiseration Week" in lamenting the 40 year anniversary of the close of the Second Vatican Council, that one who is obviously not taking Christ at His word or heeding orthodox Catholic teaching is Benedict XVI as he follows the sad legacy of his conciliar predecessors in acknowledging other religions while chipping away at the foundations of the Roman Catholic Church. His latest foray into heresy is to do away with Limbo. Just as Paul VI wasn't satisfied with the Divinely-ordained sacraments and Holy Sacrifice of the Mass and John Paul II wasn't satisfied with the Heavenly-sent Rosary, so also the great advocate of collegiality Ratzinger now wants to do away with Limbo for it is more "compassionate" for all those who "desire the transcendent." We knew Ratzinger was a Modernist, but we had no idea he was a Buddhist too. This is just another manifestation of the church of Vatican II abandoning the dogma of Extra Ecclesiam Nulla Salus. Father refutes Benedict's latest insanity with both Scripture and documentation by two of the greatest Doctors of the Church including the misquoted St. Augustine. Regardless of the conciLIAR liars, if we follow all that the infallible perennial Living Magisterium of the Church has always taught, as Father affirms we too will, as St. Paul says in today's Epistle, have "Joy and Peace in Believing." [bold and italics below are editor's emphasis.]


    The Church has always taken Jesus Christ at His Word: "Go into the whole world and preach the gospel to every creature. He who believes and is baptized shall be saved, but he who does not believe shall be condemned" (Mark 16:16). St. Paul speaks to those who believe in the Epistle of the Mass on the Second Sunday of Advent: "Now may the God of hope fill you with all joy and peace in believing, that you may abound in hope and in the power of the Holy Spirit" (Romans 15:13).

    Joy and peace in believing? We are indeed in need of the power of the Holy Ghost and His gifts if we are to persevere in the faith handed down to us from the Apostles, the Blessed Virgin Mary and the martyrs and saints of former times. How the heretics rant and rave against the true faith!

    Who shall be saved? "He who believes and is baptized," says Our Lord. The possibility of the salvation of the unbaptized under certain rare circumstances known only to God may be admitted, since the God Who gave the Law is not under the Law. But the gates of Heaven have now been opened wide, as Zenit News Service reports:

    "Whoever seeks peace and the good of the community with a pure conscience, and keeps alive the desire for the transcendent, will be saved even if he lacks biblical faith, says Benedict XVI. The Pope made this affirmation today at the general audience, commenting on a meditation written by St. Augustine (354-430)" (Nov.30, 2005. Zenit.org).

    In Benedict's own words: "They have a spark of desire for the unknown, for the greatest, for the transcendent, for a genuine redemption. And he (St. Augustine) says that among the persecutors, among the nonbelievers, there are people with this spark, with a kind of faith, of hope, in the measure that is possible for them in the circumstances in which they live. With this faith in an unknown reality, they are really on the way to the authentic Jerusalem, to Christ."

    It should be noted that "nonbelievers" or "unbelievers" in current Vatican usage refers to those who have no belief at all in any kind of god. The representatives of the false religions who assembled in Assisi for John Paul II's prayer meeting in 1986, were all considered "believers". Now all one needs is a "desire for the transcendent." Clearly, the defined Church doctrine, "Outside the Church there is no salvation," is among the many casualties of Vatican II.

    Pity the poor saints and martyrs, like St. Andrew, crucified on an x-shaped cross, and St. Francis Xavier, who preached the Gospel in India and Japan, and died on the island of Sancian off the coast of China. They sacrificed themselves for the sake of bringing the Gospel - and Baptism - to the pagans, believing that they would be lost without the true faith. In the Epistle which is read on both their feasts, which occurred this past week, we hear these words: "Faith then depends on hearing, and hearing on the word of Christ" (Romans 10:14;17).

    To further perplex and confuse the faithful, it is reported now that Benedict will soon drop the notion of Limbo from official Catholic doctrine, as we hear in this report from Rome:

    "Limbo has long been held to be the place where the souls of children go if they die before they can be baptized. However, a 30-strong international commission of theologians summoned by the late John Paul II last year to come up with a 'more coherent and illuminating' doctrine in tune with the modern age is to present its findings to Pope Benedict XVI on Friday (December 2, 2005).

    "Vatican sources said yesterday that the commission would recommend that Limbo be replaced by the more 'compassionate' doctrine that all children who die do so 'in the hope of eternal salvation'.

        "There is little doubt that the Pope will agree. As Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger he presided over the commission's first sessions. He is on record as saying that Limbo has no place in modern Catholicism. In 1984, he told Vittorio Messori, the Catholic author, that Limbo had 'never been a definitive truth of the faith'. He said: 'Personally, I would let it drop, since it has always been only a theological hypothesis.' The commission is currently chaired by Archbishop William Levada of the United States, appointed by the Pope in May to be his successor as Prefect of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith" (Richard Owen, "Limbo consigned to history books," November 30, 2005, timesonline.co.uk).

    Fr. Thomas Williams, interviewed from Rome on NBC's Today Show, admitted that the question remains, "What's the use of being baptized, if the same fate awaits those who are baptized and those who are not?" So we just leave the unbaptized children to the mercy of God, since "He will know what to do with them." But the new policy of Benedict XVI towards Limbo - "Let it drop" - goes further than that. Limbo will be "consigned to the history books."

    St. Thomas expresses the widely accepted teaching of the Catholic Church concerning Limbo (In II Sent., dist. XXXIII, Q. ii, a. 5):

    "'Although unbaptized infants are separated from God as far as glory is concerned, yet they are not separated from Him entirely. Rather are they joined to Him by a participation of natural goods; and so they may even rejoice in Him by natural consideration and love,' Again (a. 2) he says: 'They will rejoice in this, that they will share largely in the divine goodness and in natural perfections.'" (newadvent.org).

    St. Augustine, may have speculated about the fate of the unbaptized, but here he speaks clearly:

    "It is an excellent thing that the Punic Christians call Baptism itself nothing else but salvation, and the Sacrament of Christ's Body nothing else but life. Whence does this derive, except from an ancient and, as I suppose, apostolic tradition, by which the Churches of Christ, hold inherently that without Baptism and participation at the table of the Lord it is impossible for any man to attain either to the kingdom of God or to salvation and life eternal? This is the witness of Scripture too" ("Forgiveness and the Just Deserts of sins, and the Baptism of Infants, A.D. 412).

    And more clearly still:

    "A man cannot have salvation, except in the Catholic Church. Outside the Catholic Church he can have everything except salvation. He can have honor, he can have Sacraments, he can sing alleluia, he can answer amen, he can possess the gospel, he can have and preach faith in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit; but never except in the Catholic Church will he be able to find salvation" (Discourse to the Church at Caesarea, A.D. 418).

    "Now may the God of hope fill you with all joy and peace in believing, that you may abound in hope and in the power of the Holy Spirit" (Romans 15:13).

Father Louis J. Campbell


    December 4, 2005
    SUNDAY
    vol 16, no. 308
    "Qui legit, intelligat"
    Father Louis Campbell's Sunday Sermons